I have been wanting to just travel to some coffee farm that is safe and other fun things to do. Learn about the process and see the coffee plant first hand (besides looking at my potted ones on my shelf). I also wanted to make a group trip out of it, that way everyone learns alot. I think here at the 'Exchange' we could get a nice group together and make something great of it.

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Wow! The last paragraph disappeared. How did that happen?

what I meant to say at the end...

One sad thing about coffee growing regions, is that you rarely get to taste the coffee from the farms you visit. So, what I travel with is a french pot, a hand grinder and a modified popcorn popper... crude, but it is the only way I've been able to taste coffee in a way that I know it is prepared half-way decently (or at least repeatable).
I would absolutelty LOVE to go, maybe do a comparison of a farm that isn't fair trade affiliated and one that is- see the differences.
Hi to all of you wanting to visit a coffee plantation! I have to warn you, this is not for the faint of hearts.....my brother does a trip every year to our family's farm in brazil, where the focus is mountain biking and touring the coffee plantations, coffee farm and roasting facility. It is an awesome trip, but the biking requires some level of fitness :o).
His tour this year is starting on Friday, but since this is something that requires a bit of planning, who knows.... maybe next year?
www.mtbikebrazil.com
Hi Cris,

I live in Sao Paulo, love coffee and a former mountain biker, would love to meet your brother when he arrives, so we can exchange some ideas about his project.

Cristina Dias said:
Hi to all of you wanting to visit a coffee plantation! I have to warn you, this is not for the faint of hearts.....my brother does a trip every year to our family's farm in brazil, where the focus is mountain biking and touring the coffee plantations, coffee farm and roasting facility. It is an awesome trip, but the biking requires some level of fitness :o).
His tour this year is starting on Friday, but since this is something that requires a bit of planning, who knows.... maybe next year?
www.mtbikebrazil.com
My shops are in Mexico. If anyone is planning to visit farms in Mexico or Guatemala, I would be happy to come along as a translator. I may also be able to facilitate tours or activity planning.
I am new to the Exchange and found you guys while searching for "coffee farm travel.:" I am a small roaster interested in visiting a coffee farm in 2009, preferably for the harvest. I am open to the country...have a sense of adventure, but safety is important. I am also interested in making contact with fair trade farms in order to eventually buy coffee. Is this possible for a small, local roaster?
Regina Alleman said:
I am new to the Exchange and found you guys while searching for "coffee farm travel.:" I am a small roaster interested in visiting a coffee farm in 2009, preferably for the harvest. I am open to the country...have a sense of adventure, but safety is important. I am also interested in making contact with fair trade farms in order to eventually buy coffee. Is this possible for a small, local roaster?
My name is Henry Hueck and we are in Nicaragua, we have three coffee farms and could help you once you get here...ramacafe17@gmail.com
for more info also you could be in touch with us at encuentro@ramacafe.org
We also have good friends in the fair trade if you like to get in touch with them...
best reagrds
HH



HENRY HUECK said:
Regina Alleman said:
I am new to the Exchange and found you guys while searching for "coffee farm travel.:" I am a small roaster interested in visiting a coffee farm in 2009, preferably for the harvest. I am open to the country...have a sense of adventure, but safety is important. I am also interested in making contact with fair trade farms in order to eventually buy coffee. Is this possible for a small, local roaster?
HENRY HUECK said:
My name is Henry Hueck and we are in Nicaragua, we have three coffee farms and could help you once you get here...ramacafe17@gmail.com
for more info also you could be in touch with us at encuentro@ramacafe.org
We also have good friends in the fair trade if you like to get in touch with them...
best reagrds
HH



HENRY HUECK said:
Regina Alleman said:
I am new to the Exchange and found you guys while searching for "coffee farm travel.:" I am a small roaster interested in visiting a coffee farm in 2009, preferably for the harvest. I am open to the country...have a sense of adventure, but safety is important. I am also interested in making contact with fair trade farms in order to eventually buy coffee. Is this possible for a small, local roaster?
Don't forget that you have coffee grown here in Hawaii, USA as well:

Kona (on the Big Island) has approximately 700 small farms with a variety of micro climates, cultivation methods, and actually a multitude of trees being grown (even that the majority is the kona typica). Starbucks just flew a bunch of their baristas over here in their brand new corporate jet (now U know why they closed some stores;-) for the reason this thread was brought up.

Ka'u region ( Big Island) is a new frontier for coffee growers and has a pioneer spirit to it. Can certainly hold the standards of Kona but doesn't have its market established yet.

Kauai island has mechanized production and one of the largest coffee plantation in the world. Maui, Oahu and Molokai also have coffee farms, but fewer than the Big Island.

The good things about Kona, Hawaii are the proximity to the USA, English being first language, seed to cup production often all in one farm, and many farmers interested to make direct connections to small roasters and cafés. And the non-coffee things-to-do are not bad either: Active volcanoes, beaches, snorkeling, jungle hikes, horseback riding, and much more. No snakes, no creepy crawlers, no immunization shots (or passport when traveling from the US) needed. No personal safety issues either. Even if you prefer other coffees, think about it that way: Next to Napa wine, Kona coffee is the premiere food product of the USA, served in the White House and on the Space Shuttle.

For Kona farms are two websites with farms listed: http://www.kona-coffee-council.com/, http://www.konacoffeefarmers.com

Some farms overlap, but anyone wanting to visit/contact a farm will have many options. The two organizations have a bit of a fight with each other. (One accuses the other of being processor controlled, and the other is accused of being controlled by 'gentlemen farmers' with no real stake in coffee.) Many of the listed farms have websites where you can get an impression of a particular farm. Some small farms have a B&B attached or at least one nearby. MAke sure you visit a few while here to get a better overall picture. Some even look for seasonal helpers.

For Kauai, Oahu, Maui and Molokai farm operations you should check the members names on http://www.hawaiicoffeeassoc.org

Contact me directly if you need more info - I am a Kona coffee farmer myself. Could also help to find some more affordable accommodations, as the island is a bit desperate for more tourism (no, I don't own a hotel ;-)

Wherever you go listen carefully to the respective descriptions of how the coffee is grown, harvested, processed, stored, shipped; of how the quality is being achieved and controlled. Once this is understood, look for where 'corners can be cut' to increase the responsible parties profit margin. There one can find the explanation of what makes a 'great' coffee from a great region, compared to a 'so-so' coffee with a great regional name attached.
i would love love love to go if a group thing is arranged.
visit a coffee farm is so high up on my list of things to do in life.
Hey guys I posted pictures of the house we have for coffee tours where you can visit the plantation in Antigua Guatemala and stay at affordable prices. The house is located 10 minutes from the coffee plantation. for more information visit www.kafesguatemala.com or if u want to check the house u can see it in facebook, search us as Kafes Guatemala.

Coffee plantation visit & activities
coffee tours in mules, walking , by truck (the entire process)
bird watching tours ( over 185 species this year)
cupping sessions
roasting sessions
canopy rides (zip lines) caffeine (check the forest) and adrenaline (if you like to go fast) tours
We also have a 5 star hotel if you want to go fancy for the experience.
visits and tours in town (Antigua Guatemala recognized as one of the most historic valuable treasures in Latin America.

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