I have heard 1 1/2 brew, chill and serve. Anyone have any tips?

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The Toddy method, IMO, is pretty damn delicious, and yields the best cup. I have gotten great results, however, with either making a french press like usual, then chillin it overnight, or simply makin a press with cold water, and letting it sit for 24 hours, which is like a half-assed Toddy way.
i just read up on this. i wish i had the link. there were two major methods that most people use. one was the toddy and the other was brewing directly onto ice (which is not recomended for espresso). washed coffees are said to be great for this because they are brighter, but i would say try it all and see what you all like the best. thats what i am going to do.
i know this!
hahahaha
is it seems like Dutch? isn't it?
Benza Lance said:
The Toddy method, IMO, is pretty damn delicious, and yields the best cup. I have gotten great results, however, with either making a french press like usual, then chillin it overnight, or simply makin a press with cold water, and letting it sit for 24 hours, which is like a half-assed Toddy way.

Toddy works really well for frappes. It's delicious, and it adds a nice bit of ceremony when preparing the drink. Pulling a cool decanter full of fresh concentrate out of the fridge is much more appealing than just scooping some powder into the pitcher.

It also tends to make customers curious, and when they ask questions about what you're doing, you can tell they're really engaged and impressed. That's the perfect time to make recommendations and upsell.
Really Ben? I can't stand toddy! It just tastes so out of balance.

While a lot of shops do the toddy thing, we only do iced coffee one way: caffe shakerato.

Caffe Shakerato is a traditional Italian iced coffee. Basically, it is a long shot of espresso (very important) that is shaken in a martini shaker over ice. The basic premise is that the espresso is cooled rapidly and moved around, sparring it from the usual bitterness that results if you throw espresso over ice. I don't know the details about the science behind it, but is the only method of iced coffee that IMO protects the integrity of the coffee. It has the least bitterness, maintains the acidity and thereby balance, and really highlights the individual coffee (great for single origins). We suggest an Ethiopian, Kenyan, or perhaps Rwandan coffee. Oh, and make sure you get the lid on and start shaking as soon as you throw the espresso on, otherwise it WILL taste bitter.
iced mocha
4 shots of chocolate syrup,
two 2 shots of espresso,
swirl chocolate and espresso hot espresso melts chocolate.
add 10 ounces cold milk this cools the epresso before adding ice
swirl ice
pour all liquid into plastic cup and allow a few ice cubes in.
chocolate can be substituted with any flavoring or left out all together.
jim simon almostheavendesserts.com simhv1@gmail.com
Iced americano. Espresso, cold water, ice. Enjoy.

Wanna try this cold-infusion method though. Never had it, am curious.
Iced Clover. Use your 12oz coffee amount but on the 6oz setting and pour directly into a cup with ice. A fruity African works well.
Intendi vero Caffè ghiacciato?

You mean Iced Coffee? Caffè Shakerato is just good 'cause it's creamy. Iced Coffee, a good one: two shots (a little short), using a good (very good) Washed Arabica origin (for example Salvador Pacamara will give you an excellent result, or the Guatemala Shum Capel will too) a little sugar (raw cane sugar, for example from Swatziland, Malawi, or Reunion but not Muscobado that is too complex), a Chamapgne cup with 5 or 6 Ice cubes, just stir and immediately enjoy.

Manuel Terzi (CaffèTerzi)
I find the cold-brewed Toddy to be exceptionally refreshing. Not everyone will care for the cleaner, less acidic taste. So.. offering up both espresso or toddy for use in the iced drinks is a really nice choice.
Toddy.

Iced redeyes are incredibly delicious. Even with chilled hot-brewed coffee. I don't know why it works, but it does. (I think iced americanoes are kind of insipid, personally) Spectacularly sweet and rich.
We do cold press at the farmers' markets, and people really like it. I had someone last week tell me it was too "weak" for her, but that's the only negative feedback I've gotten. The only downer is the 12 hour brew time, so if we run out we do chilled hot-brewed, which no one seems to mind. Working in an outdoor market means iced coffee sales are totally dependent on the unpredictable weather, so it's hard to determine how much we'll need week to week. Overall, a nice offering!

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