Typically I have seen iced lattes made the same way. Cold milk, ice, and espresso shots, with the occasional flavoring. Recently my wife and I came across a coffee shop that did things a little differently. They steamed the milk for the iced latte, putting the flavor in the milk, and then poured the steamed milk into a full cup of ice pouring the shot on top. When she got it the drink was frothy, and luke warm. It was not a pleasant experience. Has anyone heard this before... Any comments and feedback will be appreciated.

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We use cold milk; however, I am going to try to iced cappuccino. That sounds quite interesting!
THIS SOUNDS ABSOLUTELY DISGUSTING!!!
I don't know, if I ask for an iced beverage, it better be cold...

At my shop I start with milk, shots, then add ice so the ice doesn't melt whatsoever.
I'm still in aww over this.
Had to say, when I went in to work today I tried it out. I was absolutely meticulous about how I prepared it. I started as Ricky noted by having some cold milk in the bottom of the cup, brewing my shots into the milk, and plopping some ice in the top of that mixture. I then steamed some milk trying to get the same micro-foam I would for latte art, and (I typically go by touch and not thermometer) i swirled the milk as I felt it climb from cold-lukewarm-warm- and right as it got to hot (but not nearly too hot to touch) i turned off the steam. It should have been about 100F if not a little less. Then I poured this over the milk/espresso/ice already in the cup and gave it a good stir. It had the consistency of a good stout beer. The taste was okay, a little heavier than a typical iced latte, but it's similar texture to beer was interesting (the micro-foam even made it look like it had a head on it). It was not bad tasting, but not refreshing either. For me, the jury is still out on whether it is a good or blah idea. I encourage you all to try it as well and tell me what you think. It is at the very least interesting.

I deem it "Iced Latte Beer"
If you're super meticulous, you can even end up with latte art on an iced latte.
I think that would be an amazing show of care and attention for the customer to receive an iced latte with a rosetta atop it. I also think that, though the traditional iced latte (for lack of a better term) is more refreshing, this "lager iced latte" is a great drink to be sipping on a hot night.

James Liu said:
If you're super meticulous, you can even end up with latte art on an iced latte.
Wow! We JUST tried this at our shop and it is absolutely SLAMMIN! The texture is a very nice touch and it is sweeter than a regular iced latte because of that little bit of steaming!

We tried both the 6-oz traditional iced cappuccino method and the iced latte method. The method my co-worker and I both preferred was (prepared in this order) the 16-oz cold cup with a splash of milk at the bottom, espresso, cup filled with ice, and milk texturized to about 100 degrees on top. It did have a nice head of foam that was great to drink straight-up strawless. Oh my, what an experience!

Terri Voltz said:

I tried this today as well. We steamed the milk to 120 (couldn't seem to end up with 100) and poured it over iced espresso. The foam floated on top and it was really good! I would definitely recommend it.
How about scooping an inch or two of foam in the bottom of the cup, then the ice, then the shots and cold milk together? The foam will magically float to the top integrating with the espresso on the way. Less foam for a latte on the rocks. The art on the top sounds nice but some customers may be expecting a truly cold drink and the warm foam may throw them off.
I've made two of these at home tonight, and I love them. I told my wife that we need to add them to the menu, and not soon enough. It's supposed to be 80 degrees tomorrow!

Deanna Kennedy said:
Wow! We JUST tried this at our shop and it is absolutely SLAMMIN! The texture is a very nice touch and it is sweeter than a regular iced latte because of that little bit of steaming!
We tried both the 6-oz traditional iced cappuccino method and the iced latte method. The method my co-worker and I both preferred was (prepared in this order) the 16-oz cold cup with a splash of milk at the bottom, espresso, cup filled with ice, and milk texturized to about 100 degrees on top. It did have a nice head of foam that was great to drink straight-up strawless. Oh my, what an experience!
we talked about that too but didn't try it... let me know if you do and if you have any success! In our discussion, we contemplated the possibility of the foam dying out by the time it got to the top, thus losing most of its texture! Let us know how that turns out! The warm foam is kind of interesting though I think!

Craigk said:
How about scooping an inch or two of foam in the bottom of the cup, then the ice, then the shots and cold milk together? The foam will magically float to the top integrating with the espresso on the way. Less foam for a latte on the rocks. The art on the top sounds nice but some customers may be expecting a truly cold drink and the warm foam may throw them off.
Ok, so the trick for adding texture to cold milk and sweetening it with some agitation is a martini shaker. Add espresso, cold milk, a couple ice cubes and shake vigorously. Fill your glass with desired amount of ice, liquid should be cold after shaking, and pour over top ice cubes. Shaking the milk with the espresso creates a nice foam on top of the latte. It also sweetens it a bit. This may be a result of the milk we are using as well. I honestly haven't tried it with other milks so can't offer any comparisons. So with that being said, shake it up. Also, if you are adding other ingredients to your lattes give it a try in the shaker. You'll see a major improvement all around. The results as opposed to stirring in ingredients are leaps and bounds better. Let me know how it works for ya.
I actually tried to sway Tazza Mia toward cold microfoam, but it never took. The few customers I served iced drinks that were made with milk steamed up to 98-100°f were really receptive. But it just never went anywhere.
I made an iced mocha like that once.....on my second day of training almost 9 years ago when I didnt have a clue what I was doing. Not to be jugemental, but EWW!

I understand the concept (I hope there was a method to that madness, at least) behind steaming the flavor with the milk: incorporating the syrpu into the milk itself witht he addition of the heat of the steaming. However, that effect can also be achieved by mixing the espresso with the syrup THEN adding the milk.

That is my personal take and how I like to make flavored iced drinks. I like the espresso & syrp to hang out and get to know each other a bit before introducing the cold milk (then ice then more milk). The two do each other a favor by the syrup helping te 'spro to slowly cool without going bitter and the hot 'spro to loosen up all the lovely, lovely flavors of the syrup. It's kind of like introducing the boy/girlfriend to your parents: the 'spro & syrup need to get to know each other before being introduced to the cold milk parents. None of those three need or want a shock, but to join together to have a great relationship.

I really hope that was a weird enough analogy for everyone ;-)

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