Drip coffee is not only the coffee made of the drip machines, but also vacuum pots, French press, and so on. It is good for brewing single orgin beans, specially for arabica beans.

Theoretically, all brewing tools can make the same drip coffe with proper management and control. Essentially, they are same.

Espresso should use specially processed beans, and can be very well tasted. Although in several countries, all cafes serve only espresso drinks, not drip coffee any more. I do believe that drip coffee can be another choice.

Same as espresso, one has to make drip coffee well. For example, *$s has its drip coffee much deep roasted and so all their drip coffee has "burnt" taste. Is that a difficult thing to know to solve? They must have their "experts" for roasting, but that simple mistake kept till now. What is wrong with them, or maybe the problem comes from the whole coffee industry.

Another example is a cafe of one German chain, in Beijing. As franchised, the owner was trained for roasting because they all have to buy a Probat 5kg roaster for their shop. But, they were not trained for coffee brewing, neither coffee knowledge. When they want me to taste their single origin beans, they made it by a small superauto machine, and made a caffe lungo, to about 120 ml. Is that because the German company would care of training them well, or they do the same in their own shops?


If drip coffee can not be well made, it may disappear for sure. So, try to improve drip coffee if you do like it or even love it. In our local market, most drip coffee are drinkable but never taste good. Probably, they want to make it bad, but not able to do it as bad as their espresso. Poor guy, they need a big "holloware" to "boil" the beans, not even grounds.

Views: 30

Comment

You need to be a member of Barista Exchange to add comments!

Join Barista Exchange

Comment by Peter Tam on June 7, 2008 at 9:55pm
For *$s, it is due to its name; but we have not been famous yet. So, the publicity is for the drinks only. If you knew the details of the cafes, or watching the clients in the cafes, you can be sure what is happening.
Comment by Bloke on June 7, 2008 at 7:39pm
"If Starbucks is to teach us anything, we should know that publicity is not an indication of quality."


Bravo
Comment by Alex Negranza on May 30, 2008 at 6:39pm
Amen to all of the above. And yes, the perc/Clover question was rhetorical.
Comment by Jason Haeger on May 30, 2008 at 12:00pm
If Starbucks is to teach us anything, we should know that publicity is not an indication of quality.
Comment by Peter Tam on May 30, 2008 at 11:52am
"Espresso is a brew method. Considering it as anything else is mere dogmatic principle, and has no bearing in practical logic."

It really works. The good tastes is not only known by professionals, but also someone who never know anythong about coffee. If it is good, people, at least many of them, may like it, if not people won't like it. It is the experience of the market. Only from our cafes, people started to learn about the real tastes of coffee.

By the way, two of the main our partners was listed by the "Lonely Planet", the travelling guide book for China. The first one was out due to our cooperation kept only for one year.
Comment by Peter Tam on May 30, 2008 at 11:45am
Not for drip. The pressure makes the great magic.
Comment by Jason Haeger on May 30, 2008 at 11:31am
Would you consider that drip as well? If "everything but espresso" is considered "drip", and if they all are brewed with hot water, then where does that leave Toddy style brewing?

You can pull a shot of "espresso", just like you can pour a cup of "drip". The result is named for its brew method.

Sure, you can blend a specific combination of beans to your preference, and maybe you like that blend best as an espresso, but that does not mean espresso is a blend of beans.

Espresso is a brew method. Considering it as anything else is mere dogmatic principle, and has no bearing in practical logic.
Comment by Peter Tam on May 30, 2008 at 11:24am
"Espresso is a brew method, Peter. You're ignoring that part."

But, not only that. It is also the beans, the drink, and related.


"And Toddy is not brewed with hot water."

Then?
Comment by Jason Haeger on May 30, 2008 at 10:49am
Espresso is a brew method, Peter. You're ignoring that part.

And Toddy is not brewed with hot water.
Comment by Peter Tam on May 30, 2008 at 10:01am
"just because they are not brewed under 8-9bars of pressure",

They are all hot water processed, and in general, they can be adjusted to have the same fineness, water temperature, ground and water ratio and so on. Then they can be the same, at least in principle. If some tools have some typical way, which others cannot do, it may make some differnce, but that is not really a big one.

For espresso, it is not only the different way of brewing, but probably different in components and surely in tastes.

It is complex, and not able to be learnt in compounds but in an "experienced theory", like ours.

Barista Exchange Partners

Barista Exchange Friends

Keep Barista Exchange Free

Are you enjoying Barista Exchange? Is it helping you promote your business and helping you network in this great industry? Donate today to keep it free to all members. Supporters can join the "Supporters Group" with a donation. Thanks!

Clicky Web Analytics

© 2021   Created by Matt Milletto.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service