Hey Guys, I was just wondering why Coffee Shops use Whole Milk ? Is it because it steams better or taste better ?

Views: 1453

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Not sure how scientific of answer you are looking for- myself, and others could break out how different proteins react when steaming, but for now, the (very) short answer is that it tastes better and, in my experience, steams better as well.

-bry
Thanks Bry, I thought so too

Bryan Wray said:
Not sure how scientific of answer you are looking for- myself, and others could break out how different proteins react when steaming, but for now, the (very) short answer is that it tastes better and, in my experience, steams better as well.

-bry
For me, whole milk is the real thing. I liken a customer who orders skim or 2% to someone ordering decaf - it's different from the norm.
i've learned that whole milk (as opposed to nonfat, soy..) contains proteins that make it better for steaming for lattes -- better for texturizing, and just a better taste! when u steam it perfectly (not too hot), there is a certain sweetness from the milk that, when combined with a perfectly pulled espresso shot, creates a cup that needs no sugar. difficult to achieve perfect texture for latte art with nonfat and soy
Its creamy without being too heavy. Its tasty. Its traditional. It steams very nicely.

That said, we use 2%. We decided to go this way at open and have never been motivated to change. The difference is very subtle, to the point that most customers are surprised to find out that we use it and not whole if they happen to notice the writing on the milk jug. We felt like this was a positive move, a very small taste sacrifice for a substantial health benefit.
Jose... About two years ago, I asked specialty coffee retailers what milk they were using and why. Smaller locations and kiosks with smaller menus tended to pick whole milks, and larger shops offered everything from half and half to soy. The answer, for me, was "in the cup." On a trip a couple years ago that took me through San Francisco and San Jose, I stopped at both Blue Bottle in the alley on Linden, and then at Barefoot in Santa Clara. When I tasted their cappuccinos, and found out that they were using Clover Brand whole, and also testing a special "barista blend" milk, I wanted my milk drinks to taste like theirs. I settled on a 50-50 mix of Organic Whole and Half n Half. For those few friends that are lactose intolerant, I accomodate with Soy, and for those that ask for 2%, I tell them to "spit out the candy bar and try to enjoy my cap just the way I make it." (smile) They get the idea and understand that my rich milk is not the weakest link in their health-chain.

There's no question in my mind that my higher fat milks yield a sweeter and smoother froth. Although I am intrigued by Brady's 2% choice. I would think that they must do a good job, as he did say that most clients don't seem to notice. Although, I wonder if it's because they aren't exposed to the heavier milks?

I'd like to know what you've been using over the past few years?
Well Al, I've been using Whole milk and for the same reasons listed on your Reply. Thanks !!!

Al Sterling said:
Jose... About two years ago, I asked specialty coffee retailers what milk they were using and why. Smaller locations and kiosks with smaller menus tended to pick whole milks, and larger shops offered everything from half and half to soy. The answer, for me, was "in the cup." On a trip a couple years ago that took me through San Francisco and San Jose, I stopped at both Blue Bottle in the alley on Linden, and then at Barefoot in Santa Clara. When I tasted their cappuccinos, and found out that they were using Clover Brand whole, and also testing a special "barista blend" milk, I wanted my milk drinks to taste like theirs. I settled on a 50-50 mix of Organic Whole and Half n Half. For those few friends that are lactose intolerant, I accomodate with Soy, and for those that ask for 2%, I tell them to "spit out the candy bar and try to enjoy my cap just the way I make it." (smile) They get the idea and understand that my rich milk is not the weakest link in their health-chain.

There's no question in my mind that my higher fat milks yield a sweeter and smoother froth. Although I am intrigued by Brady's 2% choice. I would think that they must do a good job, as he did say that most clients don't seem to notice. Although, I wonder if it's because they aren't exposed to the heavier milks?

I'd like to know what you've been using over the past few years?
We used to pour half whole and half skim, then we switched to all whole. No one really noticed, with the exception of the baristas. It soes steam better, and IMHO tastes better, but I don't really like milk + coffee, so MHO doesn't mean much.
Al Sterling said:
...for those that ask for 2%, I tell them to "spit out the candy bar and try to enjoy my cap just the way I make it." (smile) They get the idea and understand that my rich milk is not the weakest link in their health-chain.

This is great, Al. Point well taken. Please don't read too much into my response to this - the bulk of the drinks that are ordered are additionally sweetened in some way.

I'd love to switch the smaller simpler drinks (maccs, capps, and smaller lattes) to a nice organic whole milk at some point. We've gradually begun making inroads, and seem to get a new trad capp customer every week, so this change is probably coming soon.
Brady... Within the context of your coffee business, I understand that progression through milk choices. It makes perfect sense. Jose's post reminds me of how much time I spent researching milk choices. I think we'd all agree that the smaller the drink, (traditional macchiatos, cappuccinos, small lattes, etc.), the less of an issue the negatives of milk fats become, and the more we look at optimizing the taste, texture, etc. And to bring it home, when it comes to grabbing a drink for myself, my drinks are usually mixed with milk. My daily "picker-upper" is what I call an "extended macchiato." And on top of my rich milk, it has one pak of brown sugar. (see attached photo) I do roast at home, and am frequently taste testing straight shots of SO's from family and friends in Brasil. But if given the choice, I crave the adulterated stuff. By the way, after trying a few milk suppliers, I also found that organic frothed better than non-organic. Someone posted an explanation about the proteins that supported the results. And to be fair, that was primarily why I went with organic milks. The health issue, although appreciated, wasn't high on my list of qualifiers.

Brady said:
Al Sterling said:
...for those that ask for 2%, I tell them to "spit out the candy bar and try to enjoy my cap just the way I make it." (smile) They get the idea and understand that my rich milk is not the weakest link in their health-chain.

This is great, Al. Point well taken. Please don't read too much into my response to this - the bulk of the drinks that are ordered are additionally sweetened in some way.

I'd love to switch the smaller simpler drinks (maccs, capps, and smaller lattes) to a nice organic whole milk at some point. We've gradually begun making inroads, and seem to get a new trad capp customer every week, so this change is probably coming soon.
Attachments:
I really enjoy the sweetness found in whole milk when steamed to about 145 degrees. The fat also seems to carry flavor unlike other milk options. I could see there being health concern if you're drinking two 20 oz lattes per day but if you are more of a traditionalist such as myself, I see no health concern in drinking a couple of 6 oz caps or lattes.
Very true Jonathan. The unhealthy choice is not the whole milk, its the 20oz drink. But that's another discussion...

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Barista Exchange Partners

Barista Exchange Friends

Keep Barista Exchange Free

Are you enjoying Barista Exchange? Is it helping you promote your business and helping you network in this great industry? Donate today to keep it free to all members. Supporters can join the "Supporters Group" with a donation. Thanks!

Clicky Web Analytics

© 2021   Created by Matt Milletto.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service