Want to recognize great performance by employees....ideas? Gift certificates, Employee of the Month, etc......

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well something that suits the employee's personality. you don't want to give the shy person the title of employee of the month. 

i hope this helps, and yes it forces a little thinking on your part but a suitable recognition will show that you've put some thought into your employees.

I do Staff meeting very often just to keep every one posted on my new and futur thing as well as stuff that i want to see improve!! And aswell we we promote team work !!! not individual work performance. So we do Great Staff party every couple mount (heli biking, Catsking ,canoe camping with a wood fiire paella,) those are juste exemple. I belive that every penny spend on a great staff bonding party will comback to you several time.

Don't wait til the end of the month. Encourage and praise your employees during their shifts, and thank them at the end of every shift - and mean it. However, movie tickets might be nice.

At my shop we were offered a $20 gift certificate to a local bar we all frequent.  The challenge was best latte art, but we had to snap a pic & it had to be a customers drink not one we made for ourselves at our leisure.  Which didn't work out to be taking a pic on shift while slinging out drinks.  I think it would work if you made customers aware & had them post it to your FB.  Would probably make the customer even more excited about the pours if they were the one to show off the drink too.

That's a great idea,  you could offer a $5 gift certificate to the customer who posts the winning shot too.

Sarah L said:

  I think it would work if you made customers aware & had them post it to your FB.  Would probably make the customer even more excited about the pours if they were the one to show off the drink too.

attach a $20 bill along with a hand written thank you note to their paycheck be sure to cite the specific thing you want to recognize them for.   Hand written thank you notes go a loooong way & every one likes cash.      - I just opened my shop its something I want to do but haven't yet (my guys are awesome & deserve it but I'm out of 20 bills :-P)

I'd like to second Dennis and Nick.  The most important thing I can think of is Thanking them and meaning it.  Your business cannot run and thrive without their dedicated and hard work.  So many business owners think of themselves as the ones who are special in "giving" everyone else employment.  I've worked in places like that and it sucks.  Even a spoken, private, "Thank You" goes such a long way.  The other thing I can see is make yourself an active part of their success as well.  See if there are parts of the business that you can give them more exposure to based on their interest.  You might not be able to offer much money to them but real experience that they can use to further their careers is great.  If you make yourself a partner in their success then you'll attract those people who will be a partner in yours and care enough about running your business at a profit, for your sake.  Then, years later when you're still thriving and they have gotten their degree and are in the career of their choice they'll drive by and can honestly say "I helped build that" and know that you'd shake their hand, agree, and say "Thank You.  I couldn't have done it without you".

very well stated. I couldnt agree more. I hire staff that are usually in their last year of high school and in the first years of college. I know their stay is usually temporary and I encourage them throughout school. I take an active interest in their progress and keep up with them even after they are gone. In many ways I feel as though they are my children and their progress is important to me. They know it is, they feel it and appreciate it. And.. it doesnt hurt that I give them year end bonuses. I'm sure this helps..lol. Always remember the relationship is a 2 way street. Hire well, show them you care both in words and $$ and you will build a great staff and great relationship of mutual admiration which goes a long way in building your business.

Good luck!!

I am a firm believer in "Happy staff = Happy Customers". There are great suggestions above, and I would also agree with the sincere thanks and individual attention. It does not have to be money, though that is always nice. Take time to appreciate particular strengths, additional training/education in an area of interest (there is always so much to learn, and knowledge breeds confidence), or just bringing in lunch occasionally. Those small gestures add up and will offer you a committed and reliable group.

First, I agree with everyone's comments.  I love the positive reinforcement and like the incentives (though I sometimes think that extra money as an incentive may not be the best choice).

I do have a concern- one that I've been facing for a few months.  I manage a cafe section of a small market.  Since arriving, I have tried to retrain staff, change many bad habits, form good habits, etc.  A couple members of my team are super responsive- they LOVE helping me and each other bring better coffee to our guests.  I do have a couple who are stuck in their old ways.. especially when I'm not around [I have to take deep breathes when I find out that one of my baristas let the auto-drip run out, so to please a customer who wants coffee she grinds for a full batch (3 liters), puts a cup underneath the basket and hits brew].

Any techniques for this situation?  I don't have ability to fire (though I have hired one great new person), and I just want them to realize that we can always strive for better things.  It's frustrating to see some of my team go for awesome and the other two settle for mediocre at best.  I want to try incentives but at this point I don't want it to seem like there is favoritism... (it's already seen as such).  

Thoughts? 

Have you tried sitting down with them and conducting a tasting comparing the cup under basket technique to, say, an aeropress? Sometimes, just experiencing the difference can make a difference. Or....you could reduce their schedules until they decide to leave.

Johnny Steverson said:

First, I agree with everyone's comments.  I love the positive reinforcement and like the incentives (though I sometimes think that extra money as an incentive may not be the best choice).

I do have a concern- one that I've been facing for a few months.  I manage a cafe section of a small market.  Since arriving, I have tried to retrain staff, change many bad habits, form good habits, etc.  A couple members of my team are super responsive- they LOVE helping me and each other bring better coffee to our guests.  I do have a couple who are stuck in their old ways.. especially when I'm not around [I have to take deep breathes when I find out that one of my baristas let the auto-drip run out, so to please a customer who wants coffee she grinds for a full batch (3 liters), puts a cup underneath the basket and hits brew].

Any techniques for this situation?  I don't have ability to fire (though I have hired one great new person), and I just want them to realize that we can always strive for better things.  It's frustrating to see some of my team go for awesome and the other two settle for mediocre at best.  I want to try incentives but at this point I don't want it to seem like there is favoritism... (it's already seen as such).  

Thoughts? 

Hey, 

I have... I try to do several tastings with everyone... different techniques, different beans, and of course a couple are much more interested than others.  I am trying to get everyone to our roaster to see that, but of course- a few keep bailing out.  And I don't have the ability to cut their hours that much (they have been here since opening, and to MY management that trumps skill and care).  I can and have adjusted their schedules and hours a little though.  It's also very hard to get them to meet if they aren't scheduled for work.


Jim Almo said:

Have you tried sitting down with them and conducting a tasting comparing the cup under basket technique to, say, an aeropress? Sometimes, just experiencing the difference can make a difference. Or....you could reduce their schedules until they decide to leave.

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