Has anybody used one of these pitcher rinsers? I am thinking this might be easier to install than a hand wash sink in our tight space.

http://espressoparts2.zoovy.com/c=4OOxjepU2J04ISiQg1R6lF9BL/product...

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The dudes out at MADCAP in Grand Rapids MI have one and it was pretty sweet, fast, and water saving using one of them compared to even a small hand wash sink... I wish I had one for my shop(sigh)
Check w/ local health codes. I doubt you can replace your sink w/a pitcher rinser. Otherwise they look pretty handy.
I want one I wish they made one that could do blender containers too.
we don't currently HAVE a sink next to the espresso machine. Currently, the baristas are supposed to walk down to the dish sink to wash their pitchers.

We were going to put a small hand wash sink next to esp. machine, but then saw this as probably a better option.

so how does the handy dandy rinser thing work exactly?
I suspect from the look of it that you push the pitcher down, upside-down, on top of those little black spidery fingers, they open the valve and water sprays up in jets from those little holes in the middle part.

It's tiny, at 6x6 or 6x10 inches.

I'd wonder if it would be a legit place to dump your leftover milk. Not going to ask where that goes in your current layout.

BTW Jason, I saw a blender rinser there too... might check it out.
I suspect from the look of it that you push the pitcher down, upside-down, on top of those little black spidery fingers, they open the valve and water sprays up in jets from those little holes in the middle part.

It's tiny, at 6x6 or 6x10 inches.

I'd wonder if it would be a legit place to dump your leftover milk. Not going to ask where that goes in your current layout.

BTW Jason, I saw a blender rinser there too... might check it out.
I saw the little red rinser too, I just wish I could have both in the same product. I mean it's just a matter of making a bigger one. You guys know counter space is always at a premium. I do think it's a good idea and I really think it would save a ton of water. It will go on my ever growing list of upgrades to the shop.

Brady said:
I suspect from the look of it that you push the pitcher down, upside-down, on top of those little black spidery fingers, they open the valve and water sprays up in jets from those little holes in the middle part.

It's tiny, at 6x6 or 6x10 inches.

I'd wonder if it would be a legit place to dump your leftover milk. Not going to ask where that goes in your current layout.

BTW Jason, I saw a blender rinser there too... might check it out.
The genesis of the pitcher rinser actually comes from the bar world where a similar system is used to rinse beer glasses.

I had the opportunity to work with one while steaming milk at the USBC Fourth Machine in Portland earlier this month. Espresso Parts had supplied their "mobile unit" consisting of the rinser mechanism being mounted in a 6" deep sixth pan which was mounted in a handy travel case.

It's quite simple to use, just place the pitcher upside down on the star and press down. The water showers upwards and rinses out the pitcher. It's quick and easy.

The problem with the system is that it only rinses out the interior of the pitcher. If you're like me and tend to drip a little down the sides, then nothing is going to clean that up and continual usage of the pitcher during a heavy rush without sink rinsing the exterior will result in continual buildup of milk and foam residue on the exterior of the pitchers.

While the rinser is good for narrow window cleaning of the pitcher, it is unable to address long-term exterior residue buildup and you will still need to utilize your regular sink to keep the pitcher exterior clean. But for short-term, quick rinses, it works brilliantly.

The installed models I've seen are flush mounted with a deep, perforated S/S tray to keep and allow your pitchers to drip dry. They look nice and should perform well.

However, another problem I encountered with the mobile unit, that may or may not be an issue with the installed version is milk foam drainage. With the mobile unit, I found that under heavy use, the residual milk foam in the pitcher would be transferred to the bottom of the mobile unit and begin to accumulate. After a while of heavy use, the accumulated milk foam had reached the top of the star and would then rim the rinsed pitcher with a ring of old milk foam. Not an ideal situation.

This condition occurred mainly due to one factor: the small diameter of the waste port. On the mobile unit, it simply is too small to handle a heavy rush of milk foam residue. While I didn't have the opportunity to inspect an installed version, I suspect that the installed version has a larger waste port diameter that will either eliminate or mitigate this problem.

Otherwise, it's a great device for rinsing pitchers in a pinch.
Jason Shipley said:
I saw the little red rinser too, I just wish I could have both in the same product. I mean it's just a matter of making a bigger one. You guys know counter space is always at a premium. I do think it's a good idea and I really think it would save a ton of water. It will go on my ever growing list of upgrades to the shop.

Brady said:
I suspect from the look of it that you push the pitcher down, upside-down, on top of those little black spidery fingers, they open the valve and water sprays up in jets from those little holes in the middle part.

It's tiny, at 6x6 or 6x10 inches.

I'd wonder if it would be a legit place to dump your leftover milk. Not going to ask where that goes in your current layout.

BTW Jason, I saw a blender rinser there too... might check it out.

We've had a Red rinser in a sink next to our machine for about 3 years, we rinse EVERYTHING with it. It is dandy, and the sink still functions as a handwash sink, no qualms from the health dept.
The greatest thing about having a pitcher rinser behind the bar at your shop is that when other baristi visit, they become visibly jealous and ask to use it. We've had a few throwdowns at my shop, and the visiting baristi always take it upon themselves to make sure the pitchers are spotless.

The pitcher rinser is incredible useful, but isn't a substitute for a well-placed hand sink. In the middle of a rush I can clean a pitcher in 3-5 seconds, but the exteriors of the pitcher aren't cleaned. The drain on ours is small and fairly slow, I'm not sure if all pitcher rinsers have this problem or just ours. It works best if the pitcher is empty of excess milk so I try to have 1 oz or less in my pitcher when I use it.

I'll use it in a pinch to clean a pitcher, but the hand sink is still my preferred method of cleaning out pitchers. As soon as the rush is over, I'll hunt down the pitchers I rinsed and bring them over to the hand sink to give them a good exterior scrub.
I have been to two different shops that had this installed, and HIGHLY recommend them. Very, very cool inexpensive tool you will use alot!
As far as Washington State rules. This would not pass as a hand washing sink. Be sure and check with your local codes before investing or installing with the intent to meet code.
Cheers,
JoeR

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