Hi Fellow COffee friends.!

 

Purest Café would like to treat all baristas & roasters & producers & personel in the coffee world to a special Honey Macchiato (50% off)!!! Happy Holidays!!!

 

Wishes best to everyone, and peace to our world!

purestcafe.net

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well Brady what would be the difference between a latte machiatto and a latte ? and well i am not really snob at all.. i juste don t see the point for 2 different name for the same product. I just remove the macchiato from our menu board.. here every think of the starbuck drink and i decide to go for a piccolo latte insaide

The drink that most of us serve as a latte is the caffe latte - coffee and milk.  Its on my menu as just a latte too, so not taking jabs there.  It is a legitimate abbreviation of the drink's full name, so long as we in the industry don't forget the drink's full, original name and meaning.

 

The difference between a latte macchiato and a caffe latte is the order of assembly, which effects the degree to which the milk and coffee integrate.  The latte macchiato is a more layered drink, which subtly changes the flavor.  I don't have them on our menu, and haven't had many.  They don't appear to be that common of an offering in the US, with the exception of that ubiquitous caramel bastardization (said because it's often just a caramel flavored caffe latte).

 

BTW, we've had good luck with the espresso macchiato being listed on our menu as "espresso macchiato".  Prior to that, we'd listed it as "traditional macchiato", and we'd have a couple of accidental orders a week.  Now its hardly ever ordered accidentally, or even asked about.  I think that keeping the word espresso in the name scares away the uninitiated from what might otherwise be seen as a "safe" choice AND helps those that are looking for it find it quicker.

 

olivier dutil said:

well Brady what would be the difference between a latte machiatto and a latte ? and well i am not really snob at all.. i juste don t see the point for 2 different name for the same product. I just remove the macchiato from our menu board.. here every think of the starbuck drink and i decide to go for a piccolo latte insaide

Thanks for the great link olivier, nice discussion to read through :-) Love the photos from peeps.

olivier dutil said:

tommy not to offend you but you should read this.

http://www.baristaexchange.com/forum/topics/whats-your-take-on-a-pr...
Tommy said:

For 16 oz drink:  10 oz milk, (stretched the milk silky and foamy in a 20-oz  steamed pitcher)

2 teaspoons of turbinado sugar  if the espresso roast is Medium or light

And 3 teaspoons of turbinado sugar if the espresso roast is Dark

two long-shot espressos (3 oz)

Drizzle real honey at the end.

 

see ya

Thanks for the clarification brady . Did you try the piccolo lattee on you menu? did you have luck with it?

the reason is me wanted to change is that there is other coffee shop in town that use only macchiatto on the menu for that starbuck drink so we have 10 to 20 personne a day ordering it and after explain them what it is they change there mind. i usualy offer them a latte with my home made english toffee syrup.

Brady said:

The drink that most of us serve as a latte is the caffe latte - coffee and milk.  Its on my menu as just a latte too, so not taking jabs there.  It is a legitimate abbreviation of the drink's full name, so long as we in the industry don't forget the drink's full, original name and meaning.

 

The difference between a latte macchiato and a caffe latte is the order of assembly, which effects the degree to which the milk and coffee integrate.  The latte macchiato is a more layered drink, which subtly changes the flavor.  I don't have them on our menu, and haven't had many.  They don't appear to be that common of an offering in the US, with the exception of that ubiquitous caramel bastardization (said because it's often just a caramel flavored caffe latte).

 

BTW, we've had good luck with the espresso macchiato being listed on our menu as "espresso macchiato".  Prior to that, we'd listed it as "traditional macchiato", and we'd have a couple of accidental orders a week.  Now its hardly ever ordered accidentally, or even asked about.  I think that keeping the word espresso in the name scares away the uninitiated from what might otherwise be seen as a "safe" choice AND helps those that are looking for it find it quicker.

 

olivier dutil said:

well Brady what would be the difference between a latte machiatto and a latte ? and well i am not really snob at all.. i juste don t see the point for 2 different name for the same product. I just remove the macchiato from our menu board.. here every think of the starbuck drink and i decide to go for a piccolo latte insaide

No... there's another big shop in town that uses "piccolo latte" to describe, of all things, a 6oz double cappuccino.  Sigh.

 

Paging Chris...

 

olivier dutil said:

Thanks for the clarification brady . Did you try the piccolo lattee on you menu? did you have luck with it?

the reason is me wanted to change is that there is other coffee shop in town that use only macchiatto on the menu for that starbuck drink so we have 10 to 20 personne a day ordering it and after explain them what it is they change there mind. i usualy offer them a latte with my home made english toffee syrup.

Brady said:

The drink that most of us serve as a latte is the caffe latte - coffee and milk.  Its on my menu as just a latte too, so not taking jabs there.  It is a legitimate abbreviation of the drink's full name, so long as we in the industry don't forget the drink's full, original name and meaning.

 

The difference between a latte macchiato and a caffe latte is the order of assembly, which effects the degree to which the milk and coffee integrate.  The latte macchiato is a more layered drink, which subtly changes the flavor.  I don't have them on our menu, and haven't had many.  They don't appear to be that common of an offering in the US, with the exception of that ubiquitous caramel bastardization (said because it's often just a caramel flavored caffe latte).

 

BTW, we've had good luck with the espresso macchiato being listed on our menu as "espresso macchiato".  Prior to that, we'd listed it as "traditional macchiato", and we'd have a couple of accidental orders a week.  Now its hardly ever ordered accidentally, or even asked about.  I think that keeping the word espresso in the name scares away the uninitiated from what might otherwise be seen as a "safe" choice AND helps those that are looking for it find it quicker.

 

olivier dutil said:

well Brady what would be the difference between a latte machiatto and a latte ? and well i am not really snob at all.. i juste don t see the point for 2 different name for the same product. I just remove the macchiato from our menu board.. here every think of the starbuck drink and i decide to go for a piccolo latte insaide

Well my capps are already a double ristretto in a 6 once cups my piccolo would be in a double ristretto in a piccolo cup withch is 4 0z so the drink is juste betewen a espresso machiatto and a capp,

Brady said:

No... there's another big shop in town that uses "piccolo latte" to describe, of all things, a 6oz double cappuccino.  Sigh.

 

Paging Chris...

 

olivier dutil said:

Thanks for the clarification brady . Did you try the piccolo lattee on you menu? did you have luck with it?

the reason is me wanted to change is that there is other coffee shop in town that use only macchiatto on the menu for that starbuck drink so we have 10 to 20 personne a day ordering it and after explain them what it is they change there mind. i usualy offer them a latte with my home made english toffee syrup.

Brady said:

The drink that most of us serve as a latte is the caffe latte - coffee and milk.  Its on my menu as just a latte too, so not taking jabs there.  It is a legitimate abbreviation of the drink's full name, so long as we in the industry don't forget the drink's full, original name and meaning.

 

The difference between a latte macchiato and a caffe latte is the order of assembly, which effects the degree to which the milk and coffee integrate.  The latte macchiato is a more layered drink, which subtly changes the flavor.  I don't have them on our menu, and haven't had many.  They don't appear to be that common of an offering in the US, with the exception of that ubiquitous caramel bastardization (said because it's often just a caramel flavored caffe latte).

 

BTW, we've had good luck with the espresso macchiato being listed on our menu as "espresso macchiato".  Prior to that, we'd listed it as "traditional macchiato", and we'd have a couple of accidental orders a week.  Now its hardly ever ordered accidentally, or even asked about.  I think that keeping the word espresso in the name scares away the uninitiated from what might otherwise be seen as a "safe" choice AND helps those that are looking for it find it quicker.

 

olivier dutil said:

well Brady what would be the difference between a latte machiatto and a latte ? and well i am not really snob at all.. i juste don t see the point for 2 different name for the same product. I just remove the macchiato from our menu board.. here every think of the starbuck drink and i decide to go for a piccolo latte insaide

Ronette, with a risk of sounding snobby again  :-)  sorry, but I think that we in the specialty coffee industry should push/promote distinctive quality COFFEE.   There are plenty of NON specialty coffee outlets almost everywhere that uses low grade, over-roasted coffee, why not leave the syrup fuelled menu items to them, they need all then syrups, whipped cream and chocolate chips to cover up their bad coffee.



Ronette Reynolds said:

Some of the replies in here seem so snobby to me. it really is a bummer to me that so many people put down us Americans for enjoying syrups. sweeteners and milk.  We're a fat-loving country, that's our culture.

I TOTALLY AGREE with you

Oscar Nyman said:

Ronette, with a risk of sounding snobby again  :-)  sorry, but I think that we in the specialty coffee industry should push/promote distinctive quality COFFEE.   There are plenty of NON specialty coffee outlets almost everywhere that uses low grade, over-roasted coffee, why not leave the syrup fuelled menu items to them, they need all then syrups, whipped cream and chocolate chips to cover up their bad coffee.



Ronette Reynolds said:

Some of the replies in here seem so snobby to me. it really is a bummer to me that so many people put down us Americans for enjoying syrups. sweeteners and milk.  We're a fat-loving country, that's our culture.

Hi Zack,

 

looking forward to meet you, if you do swing by Purest.. I would like to know what you think of the honey macchiato.!

 

take care!

 


zack burnett said:

Oliver, good for you.  Seriously.  However, not everyone is able to or wants to take this approach.  Personally I think coffee is best enjoyed straight-up.  But you can make some pretty damn good drinks with more ingredients than just coffee and water or milk.  Look at these signature drinks these dudes are making at the barista competitions with all of the off the wall but pure ingredients.  Why is that praised and adding a little honey or sugar is looked down upon?  If the flavors work, they work.  Who are we to tell people how they should enjoy their beverage?  What's wrong with putting flavors together that work? I think steak is best just rubbed with some olive oil and salt and pepper but will I turn down a steak marinated in a good chimichurri? Nope.  I wouldn't drink a honey latte every day but if I was offered one and the mood struck me, if it was made with care, I wouldn't turn one down either just in the name of keeping it real.  Flavor shots are another thing all together.  Those are bastardizing a good product and I can turn 'em down.  But, again if a person likes flavor shots with their coffee who are any of us to tell them they are wrong?   Anyways, that's just my opinion for whatever that's worth. :-)  Tommy, by the way I'll be in Portland next week so I may have to add you to the long list of coffee shops to visit while I'm in town.

HI Olivier,

 

thanks for the link info, happy holidays..

olivier dutil said:

tommy not to offend you but you should read this.

http://www.baristaexchange.com/forum/topics/whats-your-take-on-a-pr...
Tommy said:

For 16 oz drink:  10 oz milk, (stretched the milk silky and foamy in a 20-oz  steamed pitcher)

2 teaspoons of turbinado sugar  if the espresso roast is Medium or light

And 3 teaspoons of turbinado sugar if the espresso roast is Dark

two long-shot espressos (3 oz)

Drizzle real honey at the end.

 

see ya

Hi Brady,

 

 I put the honey on the top to add a gentle sweet texture to the macchiato, yet doesn't overpower the espresso.

  

 "Macchiato is an Italian word, meaning "marked" or "stained"."  It is an adjective, not a drink.

 

Espresso Macchiato is, therefore, espresso that has been marked or stained, generally with milk.  Caffe' Macchiato = same thing.

 

Latte Macchiato would be latte (milk) stained with espresso... generally a cup of steamed milk with a shot dropped in after the fact, making a mark.

 

Carmel Macchiato is a Starbucks creation.  Perhaps originally a latte macchiato that had been sweetened, then marked with caramel, but now more like a sweet latte with whip and drizzle.

 

It seems like any of these drinks could be legitimately used as the basis for the OP's honey macchiato.  Come on, guys... if you're going to get up on the soapbox, at least get your facts straight before you do.

 

PS... one of our baristas has been working on a honey latte for a while.  Her latest incarnation is a wonderful expression of espresso, milk, and honey.  Good drink.

 

Tommy, any reason you chose not to put honey in the drink instead of just on the drink?



Oscar Nyman said:

Ronette, with a risk of sounding snobby again :-) sorry, but I think that we in the specialty coffee industry should push/promote distinctive quality COFFEE. There are plenty of NON specialty coffee outlets almost everywhere that uses low grade, over-roasted coffee, why not leave the syrup fuelled menu items to them, they need all then syrups, whipped cream and chocolate chips to cover up their bad coffee.

 


So does that sound like the approach the OP is taking?



Tommy said:

Hi Brady,

 

 

I put the honey on the top to add a gentle sweet texture to the macchiato, yet doesn't overpower the espresso.


Ooohhh... he's adding sugar to a latte, then putting whipped cream and honey on top.

Seriously? Cut the dude some slack here.

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