Extracting a cup of coffee from an espresso machine?

A customer wants to use his espresso machine to pull (make) a 12oz coffee
 The customer does not want to make americano's 
 They want to run the shot till they get a cup (12oz) of coffee.

They have travelled to Europe and tell me this is how everybody is doing it.

My questions 
Is this true?
how would this method affect the espresso machine? pumps etc?
If this is true what type of grind would they be using?

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Ceridwen Taylor-Roads said:
Well To-Go cups are standard now, but the rest you said is absolutely true. (Even the getting chummy part, these hells are made by yet another Italian-German liaison.

Perhaps in Berlin, but to-go is still a bit of a mystery at places like Cafe Rau in the backwoods Schwaebisch semi-rural neighborhoods. My omi's place still has a slaughterhouse backed up against it (my Opa was a butcher), the honeywagon still comes through regularly, and they still make mead up at the castle. They still have a Royal Braumeister!
Anyhoo, good to see you have a sense of humour 'bout the Italian-German thing.
You're way funny!
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Wow, these pics are telling me we are talking two different kinds of coffee cultures here. So romantic and almost historical... People in Berlin miss those real cafés, where you have exactly those tiny painted ceramic cups and table service. Especially the elders are still trying to get self-service and they strictly avoid Starbucks because of the mugs they have to drink out (even though there are a lot of more reasons to avoid them). Some super-hip-alternative-areas try to be more romantic again and design their coffee shops like an old living room, not only with sofas, but with cupboards and stuff. Just like on your pictures with the exception that young hipsters with huge glasses they just wear because it's cool, sit around those tables, talking more to their mobiles than their companions and are cheap with tips. So not Cafe Rau I guess. But most German culture today is taking place at cities and those are quite oriented at American culture. Speciality coffee shops are really close to those in the US (taking aside the café-crema-failure).
Ceridwen,
Nice to hear your review.

Ceridwen Taylor-Roads said:
Wow, these pics are telling me we are talking two different kinds of coffee cultures here. So romantic and almost historical... People in Berlin miss those real cafés, where you have exactly those tiny painted ceramic cups and table service. Especially the elders are still trying to get self-service and they strictly avoid Starbucks because of the mugs they have to drink out (even though there are a lot of more reasons to avoid them). Some super-hip-alternative-areas try to be more romantic again and design their coffee shops like an old living room, not only with sofas, but with cupboards and stuff. Just like on your pictures with the exception that young hipsters with huge glasses they just wear because it's cool, sit around those tables, talking more to their mobiles than their companions and are cheap with tips. So not Cafe Rau I guess. But most German culture today is taking place at cities and those are quite oriented at American culture. Speciality coffee shops are really close to those in the US (taking aside the café-crema-failure).
Some ( mostly customers ) think coffee is coffee so why not just make anything out of your 20K espresso machine? Well for starters I think it is like using a 100.00 golf club to hammer nails. Ya, you can do it buttttt, not with my espresso machine thank you very much.
Joseph

Anya Pomykala said:
You know, We have a Slayer at our shop and have pulled a few 12oz espressos at a low pressure (about 5 bars) and they tasted okay, but not really stellar. No one has ever asked for a cup like this, but I'm not sure I'd really be interested in serving it either. It just ends up tasting over extracted, even when we made the grind coarse. It's pretty cool, but we gotta figure out a way to make it taste good before people should have it.
Cool.

Anya Pomykala said:
You know that's a good point, but I guess I just think of the Slayer, as much as I worship the counter it sits on, as a tool and I'm interested in seeing what it can do. If I can make something that tastes amazing, then I might have to rename it a coffee machine instead of an espresso machine.

As a side note, the guys who make Slayer actually recommended we play around with it and suggested we try making a cup of coffee.
Forgive my fanatic obsessions. I often forget it is all about personal taste buds and your personal experience with coffee.
Joseph
-- Ambassador for Specialty Coffee and palate reform.

Joseph Robertson said:
Cool.

Anya Pomykala said:
You know that's a good point, but I guess I just think of the Slayer, as much as I worship the counter it sits on, as a tool and I'm interested in seeing what it can do. If I can make something that tastes amazing, then I might have to rename it a coffee machine instead of an espresso machine.

As a side note, the guys who make Slayer actually recommended we play around with it and suggested we try making a cup of coffee.
nyc has a shop with a slayer also offering something similar, not sure if it was taking off or not.
evidentially, it's been considered before by looking at this page on accessories from my WEGA atlas 2 manual, or as it says "instructions for the user"

Photobucket

has anybody ever even seen or used of any of theses "accessories"? outside the novelty of the 50 GRAM! pf, the very idea of drinking anything made using these device personally scares me (esp, the plastic capp maker... shudder)
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Ceridwen Taylor-Roads said:
Wow, these pics are telling me we are talking two different kinds of coffee cultures here. So romantic and almost historical...

Uhm, almost.
Cafe Rau is a pretty cool place, but the last pic is my at my ma's friend's house. The leftmost person is her (the one using the espresso machine for her cafe cremas) and then her hubby, meine Tanta Ursula, my mom and pop, and my Onkel Hans' nose. Note the paper napkins with her kaffee kit. There is a cat in town that prints paper and cloth napkins to match whatever the pattern is on your coffee service.
And The middle picture is us walking with the Royal Braumeister. Right before he sent me off with a coupla cases of beer, so that I wouldn't 'starve' in America! ; >
Karl said:
Volumes like 12oz are a myth or drinks for people you don't want to serve.

yeah.
Flat black? sounds gross, makes your machine do awful things.
I pulled long shots on my Pavoni with a coarser grind (home machine btw) and it is pleasant, but that was done more because of limitations at the time and me playing around on a lever machine. The shots I made then were quite sweet, I enjoyed them a great deal.....

I do not know if 12 oz will fly ....but im gonna try this out on Saturday and I will post some pics or a vid.
that is mostly french !!! i get at or coffee once in a bit a french canadien asking for a alonger!! (extra long shot) offer then a americano and if they sai no thanks well i make then one but .. will not break my machine on it so i juste put much less coffee in the portefiler and dont temp in as hard.( i know this sound bad) but they are always happy after that, and a custumer happy worth much more then a custumer desapointed. most of the time those customer are only touriste since the regular i slowly convert them to americano but a happy tourist will spread the word .

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