Hello

My name is Stephen. I am very new to this site and this is my first discussion. Hope I ma posting in the right area.

I am fairly new to the whole coffee all things coffee;  the only think I knew about coffee was drinking it until maybe 2 years ago. I am about to open a coffee shop in Toronto and in the process of contacting suppliers and vendors that I met at Coffee fest in Chicago. 

I need some guidance and pointer. What kind of question should i be asking the coffee suppliers? Any pointers around negotiating term sand conditions would be greatly appreciated.

Any recommendations for a good coffee suppliers in the US or Canada?

Thank you in anticipation of your assistance.

Stephen

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http://shop.reunionislandcoffee.com/

https://detourcoffee.com/

https://www.pilotcoffeeroasters.com/

There are three very reputable roasters who you may wish to contact. I use all of them. 

Thank you very much. I will contact them

Hi, Stephen! Some of the things to consider when looking for a roaster:

-Do they sell/loan/lease equipment, or can they point you in the right direction?

-Do they have a service department, or can they refer you to a service company?

-Do they offer training? If so, what is the extent of the training, and how many individuals will they train?

-Will they have you in for a cupping? Most reputable roasters will invite you to their facility for a cupping of their coffees.

-Do they offer support in any other areas; i.e. layout design, menu, etc.?

-Do you want to work with them? Coffee is all about relationships, and you should work with someone who aligns with your values.

-Do they put roast dates on their bags?

I'd also suggest you find someone in your general area. That way you know that if you have an emergency with equipment or need a delivery off the regular schedule that they're not too far.

Hope this helps!



Jen Hurd said:

Hi, Stephen! Some of the things to consider when looking for a roaster:

-Do they sell/loan/lease equipment, or can they point you in the right direction?

-Do they have a service department, or can they refer you to a service company?

-Do they offer training? If so, what is the extent of the training, and how many individuals will they train?

-Will they have you in for a cupping? Most reputable roasters will invite you to their facility for a cupping of their coffees.

-Do they offer support in any other areas; i.e. layout design, menu, etc.?

-Do you want to work with them? Coffee is all about relationships, and you should work with someone who aligns with your values.

-Do they put roast dates on their bags?

I'd also suggest you find someone in your general area. That way you know that if you have an emergency with equipment or need a delivery off the regular schedule that they're not too far.

Hope this helps!

Thank you very much, Jen Hurd

These are really good pointers and insights. I am really grateful.

I am somewhat new this, so these are really useful.

Much appreciated

Stephen

Unique Points of Difference. Jen has touched on these above- but apart from what shes mentioned you need to be looking at a coffee roaster who produces a really good and unique product that will stand you apart from other cafes in the immediate area. Being a Kiwi I cant really recommend any of the roasters in my part of the world- the distances are impossible for quality technical support.

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