Anybody knows how to make a CREPE MIX, the professional way.
Some tips are welkome.

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Do you have crepe irons, or just a pan?

Don't overmix the batter...nothing worse than a super chewy crepe.

Krampouz has a standard recipe that is public and good for the irons they sell. You can use a more delicate batter recipe (higher in fat) in a non-stick skillet, which is nice for sweet crepes like in crepes suzette.
bite the bullet and use pan spray, I know..I know. Also which ever recipie you decide to use, let the batter sit over night. This allows the flour to fully absorb the milk making for a much more cohesive and flavorful crepe. And there hsould only be 4 or 5 ingredients...milk, egg, salt, sugar.....simple, no crap.
thanks, I have a brand new iron, and I'm researching if I'm doing the right thing.
Thanks to all.
Carlos Meyer K.
It really depends on your tastes. Just do not forget eggs, flour, and melted butter. Then either milk, lager or ale. Or a mix. Yes I know, it sounds maybe strange for you, but many make crêpes out of beer in France. The flour can be any type of extraction, as long as it is common wheat. You do not have to put sugar. You can add a bit of salt. But if your butter is salty, I would not. It is recommended to add either Calvados, rum or whiskey. Prefer Calvados if you want to make real French crêpes. It should not be thick. If you are not French I tell you: you see liquid? Well even more liquid. Do not be afraid. As a good test, I usually dip my spoon in, then put the back of the spoon upward. It should stay a thin layer, but we still should should see the color of the spoon. Do not be afraid to use a huge bucket (but clean of course) if you need to make lots of them. And before cooking, wait at least one hour.
Whereas you need real melted butter inside the mix, you need to fry it with vegetable oil. The best is to take kitchen paper towel, dip it in the oil, then wipe the pan before each crêpe.
Thanks, I made some test's with some recipie but it went south..., very south. I thing that the key in all this is a good mix and the right heating temperature, my iron is 40 cm. in diameter and they recomended me to use a 6oz. measure to pure the mix on the iron and nobody can tell me at witch temperature to set the iron, The iron has a scale from 1 to 10 I tried it at 6 and for me it was to hot, then I tried once more at 3 and it went better, but the mix dosen't fork very good.

This is the mix that I tried:
1 cup of milk
1/2 cup of flour
2 spoons of sugar
1 egg
A litle bit of salt
2 oz. of melted butter.

Could you be so kind and write me done the proportion of your mix please so I can start with a good and well tested recipie.

Very truly your's: Carlos Meyer Kanaplei

Valentin David said:
It really depends on your tastes. Just do not forget eggs, flour, and melted butter. Then either milk, lager or ale. Or a mix. Yes I know, it sounds maybe strange for you, but many make crêpes out of beer in France. The flour can be any type of extraction, as long as it is common wheat. You do not have to put sugar. You can add a bit of salt. But if your butter is salty, I would not. It is recommended to add either Calvados, rum or whiskey. Prefer Calvados if you want to make real French crêpes. It should not be thick. If you are not French I tell you: you see liquid? Well even more liquid. Do not be afraid. As a good test, I usually dip my spoon in, then put the back of the spoon upward. It should stay a thin layer, but we still should should see the color of the spoon. Do not be afraid to use a huge bucket (but clean of course) if you need to make lots of them. And before cooking, wait at least one hour.
Whereas you need real melted butter inside the mix, you need to fry it with vegetable oil. The best is to take kitchen paper towel, dip it in the oil, then wipe the pan before each crêpe.
Carlos Meyer K. said:
Thanks, I made some test's with some recipie but it went south..., very south. I thing that the key in all this is a good mix and the right heating temperature, my iron is 40 cm. in diameter and they recomended me to use a 6oz. measure to pure the mix on the iron and nobody can tell me at witch temperature to set the iron, The iron has a scale from 1 to 10 I tried it at 6 and for me it was to hot, then I tried once more at 3 and it went better, but the mix dosen't fork very good.

Often better when you reduce the temperature. If it is too hot, it sticks to the iron, or the pan. and makes lots little holes (do not worry if holes appear after, it is actually a good sign, but it should not appear at the moment you spread it). You want to have to time to spread the mix over.



This is the mix that I tried:
1 cup of milk
1/2 cup of flour

Oh, that should be actually too liquid. I would say for 1 cup of milk, 1 cup to 1 cup and a half of flour. I do not remember how much. Usually when I make it I dose visually. I just tried to compare on some different French websites with recipes and made the conversion to the American unit system, and it seems they all have at least 1 cup of flour for a cup of milk.


You want to make the mix quite liquid because it makes it very very thin. But if it is too liquid, then you get something crispy. You do not want this.


2 oz. of melted butter.

Note the butter might burn. You certainly want to reduce to 1 oz for 1 cup of milk.

Thanks Valentine.

Valentin David said:
Carlos Meyer K. said:
Thanks, I made some test's with some recipie but it went south..., very south. I thing that the key in all this is a good mix and the right heating temperature, my iron is 40 cm. in diameter and they recomended me to use a 6oz. measure to pure the mix on the iron and nobody can tell me at witch temperature to set the iron, The iron has a scale from 1 to 10 I tried it at 6 and for me it was to hot, then I tried once more at 3 and it went better, but the mix dosen't fork very good.

Often better when you reduce the temperature. If it is too hot, it sticks to the iron, or the pan. and makes lots little holes (do not worry if holes appear after, it is actually a good sign, but it should not appear at the moment you spread it). You want to have to time to spread the mix over.



This is the mix that I tried:
1 cup of milk
1/2 cup of flour

Oh, that should be actually too liquid. I would say for 1 cup of milk, 1 cup to 1 cup and a half of flour. I do not remember how much. Usually when I make it I dose visually. I just tried to compare on some different French websites with recipes and made the conversion to the American unit system, and it seems they all have at least 1 cup of flour for a cup of milk.


You want to make the mix quite liquid because it makes it very very thin. But if it is too liquid, then you get something crispy. You do not want this.


2 oz. of melted butter.

Note the butter might burn. You certainly want to reduce to 1 oz for 1 cup of milk.

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