shots below water or above??

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well we use a 8 oz cup ,4oz water and a double ristretto. i found that 90 % of customer ad milk and stir , so i found the presention more important that having the shot well mix in the water since they all do it after adding the milk , so i poor my shot on top.

and where do you get your water?

Terika said:

Shots on top...presentation is better.  Also, I wouldn't recommend using water from the espresso machine...it's not meant to keep up with that type of volume...and if you are using a machine with a double boiler, the hot water from the spout is not the quality of water you want to be serving.

We have a couple of zojirushi hot water dispensers that we use for our teas and americanos. 

Alayna Abigail Clove said:

and where do you get your water?

Terika said:

Shots on top...presentation is better.  Also, I wouldn't recommend using water from the espresso machine...it's not meant to keep up with that type of volume...and if you are using a machine with a double boiler, the hot water from the spout is not the quality of water you want to be serving.

hot water dispencer

Alayna Abigail Clove said:

and where do you get your water?

Terika said:

Shots on top...presentation is better.  Also, I wouldn't recommend using water from the espresso machine...it's not meant to keep up with that type of volume...and if you are using a machine with a double boiler, the hot water from the spout is not the quality of water you want to be serving.

Pull shots directly on top. Presentation. Maintains most crema. Crema remains on top, espresso filters down through the water. Produces a more flavorful cup than the alternative.

Water from the Bunn spout.  Shots poured gently on top, pulled right on if the cup'll fit.  The latter preserves the crema's flecking much better, and makes for a beautiful drink.

 

For those that don't drink them, I suggest trying a well-made one.  Its an under-appreciated beverage for sure, but a great cup of coffee.  When I've had as many straight espressos as I can enjoy that's what I drink.

 

If you have a hot water economizer/mixing valve (like on the NS Aurelia and others) then boiler water can be an acceptable option.  That said, the quickest way I know of to crash the boiler pressure is to draw lots of water off and let the autofill bring in lots of cold.  In fact, this is what I do when I'm trying to depressurize a machine quickly for service.  Scalding-hot boiler water from non-mixing-valve machines is inappropriate.  If it sputters and flash-boils coming out, don't use it or let it cool before using.

 

Pulling water from the groups is fine for smallish drinks.  Brilliant idea, in fact.  An 8oz double americano is perfect to me anyway.  I can't imagine that you'd get good results with 16+oz water needed for enormous drinks though... no matter how you take it out of the machine.  I suppose that pulling from the group on an hx machine at least isolates the crash somewhat.  There are more suitable pieces of equipment for the job.

On the top, please!  Ideally, pull the shot directly on top of the cup with water already inside.  The crema completely covers the water and lasts much longer than if pulled into shot-glasses then poured on top.
Shots on top.

Shots on top.

 

Terika makes a good point with regards to not using the water tap on the machine for Americanos. The best way to destroy an espresso machine is to use the water tap for beverages. Get a water tower.

Terry Z said:

Terika makes a good point with regards to not using the water tap on the machine for Americanos. The best way to destroy an espresso machine is to use the water tap for beverages. Get a water tower.


Taste should drive your decision. Two points:
I've pulled water from my spigot, from my group and from my filtered unheated water, set all three into the fridge, and tasted them when they cooled. I sort thought I tasted some difference in the water from the group-head, but it didn't seem to be that much. OTOH, we're supposed to have decent tap water, but I really don't like it. I can't imagine heating that up and using it for an Americano would make the drink any better.
For those that drink Americanoes, er.. Americani, er... An Americano and then another one... consistently, they've always reported that the drink tastes better if you pull the shots directly into the water, as opposed to pouring water over the shots or pouring the shots into the water form another container, shotglass, demi, whatever. Make a few for you and your bar mates. Taste them. Use the technique that you all agree tastes best. Rinse, repeat.
Please explain your thoughts on this. Exactly how will this process destroy a machine?

Terry Z said:

Shots on top.

 

Terika makes a good point with regards to not using the water tap on the machine for Americanos. The best way to destroy an espresso machine is to use the water tap for beverages. Get a water tower.

Pull hot water out, the machine has to put cold water back in, scale forms where cold meets hot.  So pulling large volumes of hot water for americanos (or teas) speeds up scale formation.  That's my understanding, anyway.

Shadow said:
Please explain your thoughts on this. Exactly how will this process destroy a machine?

Terry Z said:

Shots on top.

 

Terika makes a good point with regards to not using the water tap on the machine for Americanos. The best way to destroy an espresso machine is to use the water tap for beverages. Get a water tower.

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