The Drip Station is the perfect addition to any retail coffee establishment and with the popularity of single cup brewing on the rise, it is a perfect way to expand your coffee menu.

With the simple nature of pour over coffee brewing, our new Drip Station revolutionizes the single cup brew method for a commercial retail environment. This 100% stainless steel brew station can be set up anywhere, and allows you to brew 2, or 4 cups of fresh coffee simultaneously. With the added feature of a drain, we have eliminated the messy process of emptying an over filled drain tray, which was a common nuisance of past drip stations.

Benefits of adding a Drip Station to any cafe are:

• Zero Waste - as you are only grinding enough coffee for each cup, there will never be excess coffee left over, like in an airpot, to dump out once it has lost it's freshness.

• Charge a Premium - people appreciate the attention and care involved in grinding and brewing a special cup of coffee for them. The extra theater aspect and skill of the barista can easily demand an additional 35 to 50 cents per cup.

• Ultimate Freshness - we all know the importance of grinding fresh coffee, and with the Drip Station you get the freshest cup possible for each customer. Grind, Pour, and Enjoy!

• Single Origin Coffees - Expand your coffee menu to include single origin coffees without having to brew a full pot. Offer a menu similar to that in a wine bar where customer can choose coffees from around the world. This is also a perfect solution for those often loyal decaf coffee drinkers.

MSRP on the Drip Stations is $399 ... but I am willing to sell mine for $300!. It is brand new and has never been used. Shipping will be extra. I only have two of the stations to sell, so act quick if you want one.

Email me if interested. Thanks!

- Matt

Views: 3202

Attachments:

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

I still have one left if anyone is interested! After the Clover news, this may be a great single cup commercial option. :)
Hi Carol,

This station has been available for about a year and a half. I was integral in the design, and added features like a drain, etc. The amount of coffee will depend on the volume of brewed coffee you desire, 8oz, 12oz, etc.

You can also choose to use paper or gold filters depending on your preference. It is 100% stainless, and will last a lifetime.

- Matt
That is a good question. Traditionally, a Melitta cone filter sits directly on the cup so there is not a considerable distance to drop. However, in a retail environment, which is very fast paced, unlike a morning cup at home, I have found it it helpful to really be able to see the cup, and pull the cup away at the desired volume.

This extra height is ergonomically sound as to be able to remove and place cups of different sizes easily as well. If you also think about how far coffee "drops" when commercially brewing into an urn or thermal carafe, the distance is in most cases greater.

Hope that helps.

- Matt
Matt, I'm really interested in this drip system for whole-leaf teas at my Cafe. What is the cord shown in the picture since this is a self-contained system?
it is a drain, so that the unit is stationary, and you do not have to empty a full drain tray. sorry but I sold the two I have also, I think you can get one at espressoparts.com though.
That's where I first saw it and became interested in it. Thanks for the info!
has anyone installed this system?

were considering it in our shop.

I'm just wondering how you have it set up?
how do you weigh out the coffee?
how do you measure the water temp. and volume?

in a fast paced shop?

thanks!
I use a four station pour over bar. Digital temp control water tower is in the future. Currently using two 5L Zojirushi pots that keep the water at 208f yielding about perfect temp after going from Zoji' to SS teapot to be poured. Do each cup in three pours, each with water direct from Zoji'. (As opposed to over filling transfer pot and letting the water temp dive before next pour.)

Have digital scale next to station. Use SS bottom of small "cocktail shaker" to grind beans into and pour into Beehive filter. 16g for 8oz, 22g for 12oz, 28g for 16oz.

Two station pour over bar would likely be too small for most cafes. Once you learn the pour over station dance you can have all four stations brewing at once, and usually even keep straight what's brewing in which!

FWIW I couldn't afford almost $600 to buy a 4 station pour over bar so built my own. Even using $18 each way cool looking porcelain Beehives instead of plastic Melittas and buying SS drip tray all in about $200. Personally think it looks better too. Stained hardwood with a dozen marine grade clear coats.


keith said:
has anyone installed this system?

were considering it in our shop.

I'm just wondering how you have it set up?
how do you weigh out the coffee?
how do you measure the water temp. and volume?

in a fast paced shop?

thanks!
miKe mcKoffee aka Mike McGinness said:
...FWIW I couldn't afford almost $600 to buy a 4 station pour over bar so built my own. Even using $18 each way cool looking porcelain Beehives instead of plastic Melittas and buying SS drip tray all in about $200. Personally think it looks better too. Stained hardwood with a dozen marine grade clear coats.

Sounds pretty sweet miKe. I like the sound of that setup too with the kettles. You should put up pics of this on your page. Not to take anything away from the system that Matt posted originally, but I still feel like the system can be set up and started off with just the cones, kettle, and drip tray (no stand) for flexibility until you figure out how much capacity is needed. They were kinda designed to sit on cups anyway, and with the newer Melittas they have little windows cut out so you can see how much is in the cup.
Agree can/could simply use Melitta's directly on top of cups as they are originally designed to be used but don't believe it would be a true indicator of what capacity would be needed for a pour over station. Using a nice looking station provides show in addition to freshest cup possible. Daily get oohs and ahhs comments from customers. Including comments on liking the porcelain Beehouse (not beehive, oops) better than plastics they've seen for home use.

Since switching from press pot to airpot less than 3 months ago I estimate our "house coffee" sales have quadrupled. Granted some of the pour over cup sales have cut into espresso based sales since currently only offer two coffee choices for espresso based beverages at a time, but it's all good. I was offering three espresso choices (plus decaf of course) but needed the counter space for the pour over station so had to pull my 4th espresso grinder for now. Oh, want your pour over station front counter not back counter so the customer can watch it in action up close. I have mine situated with bags of whole beans directly in front of the station area, which has also boosted whole bean sales.

FWIW I use a bit more coffee per brewed cup versus with a press pot but countered by zero coffee waste since not sitting getting stale in an airpot. And I don't care if it's only held 30 minutes, it won't be as good as fresh brewed. Unless brewing over the hill stale coffee or simply cheap low grade coffees then it really doesns't matter, but that's not what I'm talking about.

Yeah, I NEED to get some pic's taken. Not just for here but more importantly for my website and for a press release about Vancouver Washington's only cafe that not only roasts their own coffees but grinds and brews each and every cup individually just for you!!!

Brady said:
miKe mcKoffee aka Mike McGinness said:
...FWIW I couldn't afford almost $600 to buy a 4 station pour over bar so built my own. Even using $18 each way cool looking porcelain Beehives instead of plastic Melittas and buying SS drip tray all in about $200. Personally think it looks better too. Stained hardwood with a dozen marine grade clear coats.

Sounds pretty sweet miKe. I like the sound of that setup too with the kettles. You should put up pics of this on your page. Not to take anything away from the system that Matt posted originally, but I still feel like the system can be set up and started off with just the cones, kettle, and drip tray (no stand) for flexibility until you figure out how much capacity is needed. They were kinda designed to sit on cups anyway, and with the newer Melittas they have little windows cut out so you can see how much is in the cup.
miKe mcKoffee aka Mike McGinness said:
Agree can/could simply use Melitta's directly on top of cups as they are originally designed to be used but don't believe it would be a true indicator of what capacity would be needed for a pour over station. Using a nice looking station provides show in addition to freshest cup possible. Daily get oohs and ahhs comments from customers. Including comments on liking the porcelain Beehouse (not beehive, oops) better than plastics they've seen for home use.
(snip)

A very good point. Visibility and "ooh, what's THAT" would drive more demand.

Incidentally, for those that are contemplating this, there was a good Chemex how-to vid on Square Mile's site a few weeks ago that has some good tips in it. Really improved my pourover results.
awesome! thanks for the help!

I was checking out the Marco Uber Boiler and thought that might be a nice addition to the bar aswell, in place of the Zojirushi.

few more questions.

do you have problems with the drip tray?

do you weigh out the three portions of water? or go by volume?

yeah pictures would be great!

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Barista Exchange Partners

Barista Exchange Friends

Keep Barista Exchange Free

Are you enjoying Barista Exchange? Is it helping you promote your business and helping you network in this great industry? Donate today to keep it free to all members. Supporters can join the "Supporters Group" with a donation. Thanks!

Clicky Web Analytics

© 2022   Created by Matt Milletto.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service