How long does ground coffee stay fresh in doser???????

Hello to all, and proffessional Baristas in particular

I would like to know everyones belief on what is the suggested time frame that ground coffee will still be useable for a fresh coffee once it is in the grinders doser ready to be dosed,
I ask this question, as a individual who stated that he was a barrister, Said" it would stay fresh for 24hrs ground in the hopper".

 

My own experince differs from this and would like to hear others opinons.

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It's shouldn't be a question of 'how long does it stay fresh once ground'!!!

You can eliminate the entire problem by grinding every gram of coffee fresh to order.

Your question should be: "How do I keep my coffee the freshest?"

But to answer your question (in a more direct statement), once the coffee is ground it is no longer as fresh as it was before you ground it. So, grind to order.
Not long at all. A couple of minutes at most.

That said, it is common practice in some areas to fill the doser with ground coffee. This is not the way to fresh espresso though.

For the record, the correct spelling is barista :). A barrister is an attorney.
Legal Reference edited to the correct spelling of barista, sorry for the edit error
Our shop grinds to order.
Babbie's Rule of Fifteens:*
Green Beans should be used in fifteen months.
Roasted beans should bused in fifteen days.
Ground beans should be used in fifteen minutes.
Extracted beans should be served in fifteen seconds.


*These are generalities, and depend on the bean, the environment, and your tastes. While there are occasional outliers, anyone that suggests that these are way off would arouse my suspicions. Especially about his tastes... ; >
I don't even know why they put automatic stops on grinder dosing chambers. Especially the commercial mazzers. Why encourage the practice of over grinding? I've worked at a cafe that had as many drinks as a barista could handle (plus some), all day long. And never found use for the system. We used level the dose back into the dosing chamber, but that was to cut down on waste, and it was going to be used on the next shot anyways.
I mentioned 30 minutes as a max that I would allow to stand, and this was dismissed as I am a professional barister, I know it all attitude.
Just another person in a coffee in a shop that thinks they are a barista<-correct spelling, by default.
Once all the replys come in, I think I will email email him this link.
+1 This is the best answer we've heard

Chris said:
Babbie's Rule of Fifteens:*
Green Beans should be used in fifteen months.
Roasted beans should bused in fifteen days.
Ground beans should be used in fifteen minutes.
Extracted beans should be served in fifteen seconds.


*These are generalities, and depend on the bean, the environment, and your tastes. While there are occasional outliers, anyone that suggests that these are way off would arouse my suspicions. Especially about his tastes... ; >
I don't remember where I'd read this, (I think it was Illy & Viani's Espresso Coffee...), but it's been found that 45% of the aromatics present in whole freshly roasted coffee beans are lost within 5 minutes of grinding to an espresso fineness. Those aromatics are essential to the flavor of the best espresso shots. Most people ( 90% actually. Flavor Perception maybe?) can't recognize espresso as being coffee if they are unable to use their sense of smell; taste alone doesn't do it. Some of those lost aromatics affect crema production as well. All that being said, I think it's best to just compare shots; one from coffee ground 30 minutes ago and left out, and one from freshly ground. Don't forget to clean out that little bit of staled coffee still resting in the grinder's coffee chute. I think your tongue will tell you what you need to know. I think it makes a big difference.
Chris said:
Babbie's Rule of Fifteens:*
Green Beans should be used in fifteen months.
Roasted beans should bused in fifteen days.
Ground beans should be used in fifteen minutes.
Extracted beans should be served in fifteen seconds.


*These are generalities, and depend on the bean, the environment, and your tastes. While there are occasional outliers, anyone that suggests that these are way off would arouse my suspicions. Especially about his tastes... ; >

I use this all the time, by the way, so you have my thanks for your contribution to coffee lore. Who's Babbie, by the way?
Without reading any posts below I will say the coffee does not stay fresh in a doser. Don't even think of a doser that way. Now when I walk into a shop I expect to hear the grinder when I order a coffee from the espresso machine. If I don't I wonder how long it has been in there. In a busy shop it may have been ground just before I or you walked in. You should be able to tell that in the first minute of crossing the threshold.
JoeR
Chris,
Thanks for Babbies Rule. I will post it for all those I see every day asking these freshness questions.
This is what Specialty Coffee is all about.
JoeR

Joseph Robertson said:
Without reading any posts below I will say the coffee does not stay fresh in a doser. Don't even think of a doser that way. Now when I walk into a shop I expect to hear the grinder when I order a coffee from the espresso machine. If I don't I wonder how long it has been in there. In a busy shop it may have been ground just before I or you walked in. You should be able to tell that in the first minute of crossing the threshold.
JoeR

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