So we have a problem at work. Our espresso has aged only 4 days past it's roast date. So the shots are coming out tasting not so good... They are really bright and bitter. The shots start to drop at the right time (around 9 seconds) but they blonde much faster than they should.

I've tried several things to try and help. I've ceased to updose, weighted out my portafilter to make sure my dose is consistent, changed my grind, and changed my tamp. It seems to help a bit but not very much.

Is there anything you guys can think of that would help me out? What do you do when your espresso is a bit too young?

Views: 89

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Updose and cut the shots off at the first blonding. That's about all you can do. Remember that the right volume of espresso is not a static thing.
Bump up the brew temperature.

Dose a bit more.

Wait it out.
You didn't share info on the coffee. I'd like to know more about your blend? I'm just finishing up a small amount of a light espresso blend from Martin Diedrich's "Kean Coffee." I picked it up 2 days out of roast, and have been brewing it over the last two weeks. I've found the flavors take longer to mature in a light roast, and compensation is exactly what was already shared by "the Jasons." I just did a small roast of a blend of Brasil, Indian and Ethiopian organics. It also was a light roast, barely if at all into the 2nd crack. Being that it's light, and knowing that there will be less oils to emulsify, I don't expect full flavor any sooner than 1 week out or more. When I roast Malabar Gold, I go into 2nd crack and can expect a more mature flavor a bit sooner. Am I correct in presuming that the darker the roast, the sooner the beans will outgas and hit their peak?
I would try to let it get as much air as possible. Open up the bags, let the beans breathe and degas...even try putting it in sunlight...
From my experiences, this has proven to be the case. (just my experiences, and not those of others, so take it for what it's worth)

Al Sterling said:
You didn't share info on the coffee. I'd like to know more about your blend? I'm just finishing up a small amount of a light espresso blend from Martin Diedrich's "Kean Coffee." I picked it up 2 days out of roast, and have been brewing it over the last two weeks. I've found the flavors take longer to mature in a light roast, and compensation is exactly what was already shared by "the Jasons." I just did a small roast of a blend of Brasil, Indian and Ethiopian organics. It also was a light roast, barely if at all into the 2nd crack. Being that it's light, and knowing that there will be less oils to emulsify, I don't expect full flavor any sooner than 1 week out or more. When I roast Malabar Gold, I go into 2nd crack and can expect a more mature flavor a bit sooner. Am I correct in presuming that the darker the roast, the sooner the beans will outgas and hit their peak?
Al Sterling said:
Am I correct in presuming that the darker the roast, the sooner the beans will outgas and hit their peak?

I would agree with that theory.

Slightly OT, but to the point of lighter roasts having "less oils to emulsify": there's an interesting article in the latest Roast magazine that looks at the effect of light vs. dark roast on crema production. They note that roasting darker brings OUT the oils, but that means there's less inside the bean for the extraction.

Which brings up another debate... what makes coffee "too fresh"? (that's for you Brian :) My understanding is that it *probably* has more to do with the gas than the oils. This would bring Roast magazine and Al's observations in line: your light roasted coffee may have to sit for longer than your dark roasted coffee, not because of oil emulsification but because of gas.

And sometimes I have to sit for longer because of gas. If you know what I mean.
After giving this a bit more consideration and making a short video I really think the solution is to really keep on top of your inventory and make sure you always have espresso that is properly settled and fresh. You gotta keep it in the right zone.

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Barista Exchange Partners

Barista Exchange Friends

Keep Barista Exchange Free

Are you enjoying Barista Exchange? Is it helping you promote your business and helping you network in this great industry? Donate today to keep it free to all members. Supporters can join the "Supporters Group" with a donation. Thanks!

Clicky Web Analytics

© 2022   Created by Matt Milletto.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service