I'm interested in what other folks are doing for capps to-go. Right now, we do a 10-oz for singles, and a 12-oz for doubles (don't worry, we're using regular demitasses for for-heres). Obviously, this creates some problems: most of our customers know capps by the rule of thirds, but not only is this not achievable in those larger sizes, they often expect something a lot drier than that (and that's still true, to a lesser extent, when served in a demitasse).

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The short answer: The closest you can get to about six ounces. We use a 8 oz. Solo. There may be a smaller, better alternative.

The longer answer: First, to paraphrase a crazy, barefooted dude:... A cappuccino is a specific drink, it's not a type of drink. So the first part of the solution is to grasp the idea firm with both hands that there are no ten ounce, twelve ounce, etc. cappuccino. It's not just a drink of thirds, it's about five to seven ounces for a reason... you can finish the drink while it's still hot, it's, as Goldilocks found out, "just right", and it can be finished so that the texture is throughout the cup without continuing to separate. It's the right amount of espresso and the right amount of thick textured velvety milk that can spread happiness and love. Encourage your cappuccino-ers to stay. Those who really are seeking a cappuccino will appreciate it more. Distinguish between those who really want a cappuccino and those who are just throwing the term about, and really just want a foamy/creamy latte. If you want to make someone a extra creamy latte to go, have at it, but education begins by the cup, or by the cappa.
John P said:
The short answer: The closest you can get to about six ounces. We use a 8 oz. Solo. There may be a smaller, better alternative.

The longer answer: First, to paraphrase a crazy, barefooted dude:... A cappuccino is a specific drink, it's not a type of drink. So the first part of the solution is to grasp the idea firm with both hands that there are no ten ounce, twelve ounce, etc. cappuccino. It's not just a drink of thirds, it's about five to seven ounces for a reason... you can finish the drink while it's still hot, it's, as Goldilocks found out, "just right", and it can be finished so that the texture is throughout the cup without continuing to separate. It's the right amount of espresso and the right amount of thick textured velvety milk that can spread happiness and love. Encourage your cappuccino-ers to stay. Those who really are seeking a cappuccino will appreciate it more. Distinguish between those who really want a cappuccino and those who are just throwing the term about, and really just want a foamy/creamy latte. If you want to make someone a extra creamy latte to go, have at it, but education begins by the cup, or by the cappa.

This is sound advice.
We found 6oz cups before we opened, but bought them before we discovered that we couldn't get lids for them. When we sell a capp to go, we first offer it in the 6oz cup, but let the customer know that if they want a lid we can put it in our 12oz cup-- but that it will only fill the cup half way. The vast majority take it in the larger cup. We only offer our capp as a 6oz drink, and it extremely popular.
we bought little paper 8oz cups for the rare cappuccino to go and for Romanos, and some other small drinks. we only have one size so it makes it way easier.

but yeah, i wold agree with the crazy dude: a cappuccino is a drink not a style of drink. Stay true, stay strong, do it right.

we assume that they want all drinks in real cups. so now we have gotten to the point where more than 65% of all our drinks are in real cups. drip coffee too.

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