Torani Bacon Syrup.

I have no words.

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I always wondered how do they make baconsalt or bacon gum.  I know there is a company that specializes in it.  And on the back of the baconsalt can its labeled Kosher! What weird chemicals are they combining to make baconsalt or baconaisse?
One of the competitors in this year's SERBC used smoked prosciutto as a powdered garnish on the rims of his sig bev glasses. I thought the drink was good. There is something about some espressos that is distinctly savory, and sometimes even salty. But a bacon syrup.... let's just say it can be lumped with ALL the other syrups. Those liquids that try to make coffee taste LESS like coffee. Nah, the syrup manufacturers can keep 'em.
Mickael Bacon salt is super easy to do. you need super crispy bacon , salt and a food processor  blend every thing together there is your bacon salt.

Mickael said:
I always wondered how do they make baconsalt or bacon gum.  I know there is a company that specializes in it.  And on the back of the baconsalt can its labeled Kosher! What weird chemicals are they combining to make baconsalt or baconaisse?

Bacon (pork) and Chocolate (cocoa) have been used in many culinary recipes over the past couple decades. Chocolate covered bacon is becoming popular in confections, I am not surprised that it is filtering into the beverage arena. Although, I am surprised that Torani have put together a syrup in this burgeoning customer palate.

 

I don't think that I would grind extra crispy bacon with salt, once the salt disolves there will be bacon dust which would burn. Not to mention food safety issues if not refrigerated. Cooking bacon to med-rare and then leaving it in a bunch of salt in the fridge for a couple days would produce a cleaner product after the strips were removed. Although, I would have no idea why you would want bacon salt. Maybe for your eggs? Baconnaise is easy, substitute rendered bacon fat for a portion of the oil when making mayonnaise. Super tasty.

troy your salt will preserve the bacon so no need for frigde . also dont you remember seen beef  jerky or real bacon bit a shelf temperatur in the super market.Dont forget salt was use to preserve before been used for seasoning. and you have to think how you use it, use its as a finishing salt.(after cooking). . if you are worry about bacon dust burning well just mix the salt with bacon oil. and i bean using bacon salt for seasoning scallop . it give a nice smoke flavour althoug you can juste used smoke salt. Also t

Delicious. I know about salt taking the moisture out of cured meats to preserve them, I would be concerned with the oils in the salt going rancid if kept out. But, yes, as a finishing salt on seafood, yum. Pancetta wrapped halibut is on my menu.

Sorry, forgot this is a coffee forum.

We are in "Off Topic" after all... divert away.

I am not a fan of bacon Flavored things....thats just me though

 

 

Bacon salt=sodium nitrate=pink salt.  It's a curative to prevent the meat from turning gray when cooked.  A little goes a long way.  1/4 teaspoon is enough for several pounds of pork belly.  *I make my own bacon at home and use it regularly.  It's not an actual pork product, just used in many meat processes, hence the Kosher status. 

 

Anywho, back to the syrup.  If you are familiar with red-eye gravy perhaps you can see the attraction of bacon and coffee.  The gravy is made by adding a chicory-laced coffee into the ham drippings when frying breakfast ham.  And then it's served over the ham and grits and eggs.  It's great stuff.  I can only imagine it would be that much better if well brewed coffee was used.

Though you are correct that sodium nitrate (aka "pink salt") is used to make bacon, in current food context, the product Bacon Salt (TM) is not sodium nitrate. It is bacon flavored salt. That is, I believe, what the original mention in this discussion meant as well.

Melanie Logan said:

Bacon salt=sodium nitrate=pink salt.  It's a curative to prevent the meat from turning gray when cooked.  A little goes a long way.  1/4 teaspoon is enough for several pounds of pork belly.  *I make my own bacon at home and use it regularly.  It's not an actual pork product, just used in many meat processes, hence the Kosher status. 

 

Anywho, back to the syrup.  If you are familiar with red-eye gravy perhaps you can see the attraction of bacon and coffee.  The gravy is made by adding a chicory-laced coffee into the ham drippings when frying breakfast ham.  And then it's served over the ham and grits and eggs.  It's great stuff.  I can only imagine it would be that much better if well brewed coffee was used.

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