I ENJOY LATTE ART...LET'S SEE YOUR'S!!!!

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Does my Avatar work as an example?


I dream Latte Art!
After seeing some of these photos I realize I have a long way to go!
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Jeff Carter said:
After seeing some of these photos I realize I have a long way to go!

Nah, not that long. Just work on the milk stretching.
a few attempts
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What's the best way to battle skinny leaves? Is my stream just too thick when I strike it across the rosetta? I already slowed down my pitcher shaking drastically, to no affect.
Pour faster, or make more foam.

Daniel Gruska said:


What's the best way to battle skinny leaves? Is my stream just too thick when I strike it across the rosetta? I already slowed down my pitcher shaking drastically, to no affect.
Ok I will try to help, keep in touch I want to know if any of this helps...Where are you starting your pour (near the rim of the cup or center)? How close is your pitcher's spout to the surface of the espresso? Does your rosetta start to show up immediately or does it take a couple seconds. Ok one more, is your cup flat when you are pouring? Tilting the cup towards your pour might allow a more full rosetta. It could really be a combination of above or more. Each barista/ Company seems to develope a little bit of a signature style in pouring. Hope this helps!

Daniel Gruska said:


What's the best way to battle skinny leaves? Is my stream just too thick when I strike it across the rosetta? I already slowed down my pitcher shaking drastically, to no affect.
the cappuccino cups I work with right now are flat on the bottom with conical walls sort of like this shape: \_/
I generally start with the cup in hand and tilted slightly towards the pitcher, with the spout inside or almost inside the cup. I have to bring the cup to a level position quickly or the pour gets funky with the weird walls. Generally art begins to appear when I 2/3 finished pouring, and shoots out across the surface of the drink very rapidly. I pour slowly at first, and very quickly as the art appears. I've tried altering this in several ways and I still get little spiky appendages for leaves. *shrugs*
Shiloh Sanders said:
Ok I will try to help, keep in touch I want to know if any of this helps...Where are you starting your pour (near the rim of the cup or center)? How close is your pitcher's spout to the surface of the espresso? Does your rosetta start to show up immediately or does it take a couple seconds. Ok one more, is your cup flat when you are pouring? Tilting the cup towards your pour might allow a more full rosetta. It could really be a combination of above or more. Each barista/ Company seems to develope a little bit of a signature style in pouring. Hope this helps!

Daniel Gruska said:


What's the best way to battle skinny leaves? Is my stream just too thick when I strike it across the rosetta? I already slowed down my pitcher shaking drastically, to no affect.
Ok, so are you moving back and forth before the white starts to pop or is that when you start movement. Maybe try not moving back towards the lip/ edge of the cup as fast. Pour each leaf closer together, you are going to feel like the cup is going to overflow, but you might be surprised. Your pour through at the end should be more of a cut (like a knife) than the thickness of a straw... a thicker pour through at the end will pull your whole design with it.

Try being intentional with each leaf, start looking at you design, how are you getting what you are pouring? How can you manipulate it? How do you make a leaf thicker? Thinner? How do you pour with a heart on the end? As you start to realize what you are doing and how you are getting the specifics of the design showing up, rather than just getting something... you will be able to start playing! I watch as many videos of other people as possible. You learn a lot!!!

Daniel Gruska said:
the cappuccino cups I work with right now are flat on the bottom with conical walls sort of like this shape: \_/
I generally start with the cup in hand and tilted slightly towards the pitcher, with the spout inside or almost inside the cup. I have to bring the cup to a level position quickly or the pour gets funky with the weird walls. Generally art begins to appear when I 2/3 finished pouring, and shoots out across the surface of the drink very rapidly. I pour slowly at first, and very quickly as the art appears. I've tried altering this in several ways and I still get little spiky appendages for leaves. *shrugs*
Shiloh Sanders said:
Single Rossetta

Here's a couple I like...

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