All right, so we figured out the grinder dilemma (Bunn G1), the nixing of flavored coffees. Now, what equipment do you use for hot water? What is the process you employ?

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8 days? Can you push the opening back another week?

The reason I ask this is because you really need a bit of time to work out systems and processes - especially if you're attempting to implement a completely new brewing method that you haven't worked with before. Give yourself some time to learn and work out the kinks so that when you do open, you're technique will be spot on and you'll be serving the best quality coffee possible to your guests. It'll go a long way for your reputation and following.

I've got a new shop that's tentatively scheduled to open on October 1st. Still hiring new baristas and training them, but I'm not sure if they'll be up to speed by October 1st. So, even though it's burning a hole in my pocket with continued expenses, it's not worth it to open unless we're ready to make a positive statement on our community.
My partner is suggesting to stick with the current roaster and the Curtis grinder brewer that's in place for now. The roaster is, well, pretty low quality.
We are buying an existing business and the closing is 31st. Can't push it back. So our choice now is to serve sub-par coffee until pour over is in place, or start with new and hope that the learning curve will be fast.

Jay Caragay said:
8 days? Can you push the opening back another week?

The reason I ask this is because you really need a bit of time to work out systems and processes - especially if you're attempting to implement a completely new brewing method that you haven't worked with before. Give yourself some time to learn and work out the kinks so that when you do open, you're technique will be spot on and you'll be serving the best quality coffee possible to your guests. It'll go a long way for your reputation and following.

I've got a new shop that's tentatively scheduled to open on October 1st. Still hiring new baristas and training them, but I'm not sure if they'll be up to speed by October 1st. So, even though it's burning a hole in my pocket with continued expenses, it's not worth it to open unless we're ready to make a positive statement on our community.
Jay's comments are right on.

The carryover customer will certainly notice the higher price - if you are charging more for a higher quality product, you need to deliver.

Let me propose two other alternatives. Both involve closing the deal as scheduled...

Option 3 - close the shop for a week while you iron out the kinks, then reopen with great fanfare, as many cosmetic changes as you can muster, and massively better made-to-order coffee.

Option 4 - switch roasters immediately and buy the equipment for a minimal conventional drip-service setup, migrating to brew-to-order down the road.

Honestly, I think some sort of hybrid approach may be better than a pure made-to-order setup. A larger-batch pourover or press into airpot to handle the morning rush, with made-to-order available as well, switching to made-to-order only for the rest of the day.

I don't know which route I would go if I were in your shoes. Good luck.
I have a Curtis water tower in my office that I have been using as a demo for the last couple months. If you are interested, I can get it to you for a solid discount. Email me if interested. matt@evansandkingcoffee.com
The Curtis Aeration boiler is a thing of beauty.
Barbara-

I understand that you will be taking over the business on August 31st. However, that doesn't mean you have to open September 1st.

If you're going to make major changes, it's better to close for a week and get things in order, then re-open with new name, new environment and new product. Yes, you might lose some customers during the down time but you should also expect to lose customers when you make the major changes - it's just the nature of the game. You lose some old-timers, keep a few but earn many new followers if your product is up to scratch.

Brady's options are good suggestions, but the other option is to do what major companies, banks and airlines do when they take over other companies. They spend an incredible amount of money for the changeover, get everything into position, then make all the changes (literally) overnight - so that what was AmericaWest counters and gates yesterday is USAirways today.
The BUNN hot water towers are perfect for this.
This may be a little off topic but...I have never understood why someone interested in opening or running a quality driven coffee shop or restaurant chooses their roaster based on free equipment. This strikes a nerve with me as a small roaster trying to compete with the bigger guys. We do not provide equipment but we do provide a superior product and customer service and can pass on good prices for equipment. We have had some shop owners go with other roasters only because they give away free equipment. These same people have admitted to drinking our coffee at home and loving it but they just can't serve it in the shop because equpiment is not in their budget.
Don't let yourself be forced into using coffee you don't like just to get some free junk. I don't see how it is in someones budget to serve poorly roasted coffee made on junk equipment. You can not gain or retain customers seeking quality with a bad product. I have seen this first hand but unfortunately some people only see the immediate future.
Also you wouldn't expect your milk supplier to give away a free refrigerator or your baker to give you a free pastry case. Why do people expect free equipment from roasters? If you really want your shop to be quality driven I think you know what needs to be done. Make your decision based on quality and not freebies or you will be doing a disservice to yourself, your customers and the speciality coffee industry as a whole. Sorry if I am coming off as preachy, I do not mean to be. I am simply airing my greivances. I have not yet opened a shop so my input may mean nothing to you but I felt compelled to post. Good luck with the opening.

Barbara Adams said:
My partner is suggesting to stick with the current roaster and the Curtis grinder brewer that's in place for now. The roaster is, well, pretty low quality.
We are buying an existing business and the closing is 31st. Can't push it back. So our choice now is to serve sub-par coffee until pour over is in place, or start with new and hope that the learning curve will be fast.

Jay Caragay said:

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