We're thinking adding grean bean espresso to the menu at our coffee shop, but need to learn more about the green beans. Has anybody know how to grind them? What kinds of green beans should be used to make green bean espresso? Any input would be greatly appreciated.

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Goes to show who retained the information after getting their food handlers card:-) At least, our locale food handlers card required for a barista same as any other food related job.

Joe Marrocco said:
I can't believe we are talking about sanitizing coffee beans through an espresso machine. I cannot believe even more so that someone would think that 200 degrees and 9 bars of pressure would not kill bacteria. Even your worst bacterias die at 160-180 degrees under normal atmospheric pressure. Most die before 140 degrees.

Just saying: There are a lot better reasons to not do white coffee.
Actually from experience in another job, long,long ago- Joe is indeed right- 72 degrees C (or 161 F) is prescribed temp in NZ for killing nearly every prescribed nasty that could be in a ground up green bean.

miKe mcKoffee aka Mike McGinness said:
Goes to show who retained the information after getting their food handlers card:-) At least, our locale food handlers card required for a barista same as any other food related job.

Joe Marrocco said:
I can't believe we are talking about sanitizing coffee beans through an espresso machine. I cannot believe even more so that someone would think that 200 degrees and 9 bars of pressure would not kill bacteria. Even your worst bacterias die at 160-180 degrees under normal atmospheric pressure. Most die before 140 degrees.

Just saying: There are a lot better reasons to not do white coffee.
How 'bout forget just killing the bio-meenies, brew straight from the steam boiler and steam "roast" the stuff!

Alun Evans said:
Actually from experience in another job, long,long ago- Joe is indeed right- 72 degrees C (or 161 F) is prescribed temp in NZ for killing nearly every prescribed nasty that could be in a ground up green bean.

miKe mcKoffee aka Mike McGinness said:
Goes to show who retained the information after getting their food handlers card:-) At least, our locale food handlers card required for a barista same as any other food related job.

Joe Marrocco said:
I can't believe we are talking about sanitizing coffee beans through an espresso machine. I cannot believe even more so that someone would think that 200 degrees and 9 bars of pressure would not kill bacteria. Even your worst bacterias die at 160-180 degrees under normal atmospheric pressure. Most die before 140 degrees.

Just saying: There are a lot better reasons to not do white coffee.
I have no doubt that the environment inside the portafilter would be enough to make even green coffee safe to ingest, much less "white espresso" that has been through some sort of roasting process. If you think about it, between the heat and pressure, the portafilter acts like a mini autoclave during the brew cycle. My comment was only meant to pertain to chewing on green coffee.
NOTE: the above comment is only true barring the presence of deep sea volcanic bacteria and certain strains of the mad cow virus. Of course, if these pathogens are present in your coffee, you have much bigger issues to deal with and it may be too late for us all.

(I never expected my career as a body modification artist or come in handy here)
Green bean espresso?? I have never heard of that, what could possibly be extracted from that? Furthermore that would taste horrible...I don't get it, where did this idea come from?
Migle Douvia said:
I guess there's a trend in UK to drink green coffee for health reasons. .

Working in a very busy uk cafe, I've never had anyone come in and ask if we serve green bean espresso, or ever heard of it before this thread. i think there's much more work to be done on the uk public regarding traditional espresso before anyone sticks green beans in a basket! what 'health reasons' are there here? confused!
came across this thread from google after reading the term "white espresso" at a nor-cal(northern California) coffee shops website. They linked it to the roaster that supplies them there "white espresso" beans: www.hasbeans.com. I look forward to hearing this roasting companies thoughts based on thoughts shared here. I help run a chain of coffee shops and have roasted our own beans for the last 2 years and love to hear about wonderfully-whacky-out-of-the-box-ideas, which i think this one would qualify for...biggest concern besides flavor profile; my grinder burrs..:(

I've never heard of preground espresso being shipped to a commercial coffee shop before?

Paul Whitehead said:
Migle Douvia said:
I guess there's a trend in UK to drink green coffee for health reasons. .

Working in a very busy uk cafe, I've never had anyone come in and ask if we serve green bean espresso, or ever heard of it before this thread. i think there's much more work to be done on the uk public regarding traditional espresso before anyone sticks green beans in a basket! what 'health reasons' are there here? confused!
There actually is a method for grinding of green coffee, to prepare it for extraction in an analytical chemistry lab. You'll just need some liquid nitrogen (fairly cheap, just the dewar will set you back). The procedure:

"Extraction of volatiles:
Green coffee beans were frozen in liquid nitrogen and finely
ground in an Olympia Express coffee grinder (at setting 5). 100 g
of ground green coffee beans were mixed with 350 mL of demineralised
and degassed water, and extracted by vacuum hydrodistillation
at ambient temperature (Θ<25–30 °C) [17,18]. During hydrodistillation
100 mL of water was added every 2 h and volatiles
were condensed in three cold traps (–196 °C). The total extraction
time was 6 h and between 250 and 300 mL of aqueous extract
were recovered. This procedure was repeated five times, yielding
a total of 1.2 L aromatic extract. Distillates were pooled and extracted
with CH2Cl2 in a Mixxor extractor (3×20 mL solvent for
250 mL aqueous extract). The organic phases were collected,
dried over Na2SO4, concentrated to 1 mL on a Widmer distillation
column, and further concentrated to 500 mg under a nitrogen gas
stream."

E. Cantergiani, et. al. "Characterisation of the aroma of green Mexican coffee
and identification of mouldy/earthy defect". Eur. Food Res. Technol. 212:648–657.

Warning: don't read this if you don't enjoy chemistry.
Attachments:
That is fascinating.

Brendon Parsons said:
There actually is a method for grinding of green coffee, to prepare it for extraction in an analytical chemistry lab. You'll just need some liquid nitrogen (fairly cheap, just the dewar will set you back). The procedure:

"Extraction of volatiles:
Green coffee beans were frozen in liquid nitrogen and finely
ground in an Olympia Express coffee grinder (at setting 5). 100 g
of ground green coffee beans were mixed with 350 mL of demineralised
and degassed water, and extracted by vacuum hydrodistillation
at ambient temperature (Θ<25–30 °C) [17,18]. During hydrodistillation
100 mL of water was added every 2 h and volatiles
were condensed in three cold traps (–196 °C). The total extraction
time was 6 h and between 250 and 300 mL of aqueous extract
were recovered. This procedure was repeated five times, yielding
a total of 1.2 L aromatic extract. Distillates were pooled and extracted
with CH2Cl2 in a Mixxor extractor (3×20 mL solvent for
250 mL aqueous extract). The organic phases were collected,
dried over Na2SO4, concentrated to 1 mL on a Widmer distillation
column, and further concentrated to 500 mg under a nitrogen gas
stream."

E. Cantergiani, et. al. "Characterisation of the aroma of green Mexican coffee
and identification of mouldy/earthy defect". Eur. Food Res. Technol. 212:648–657.

Warning: don't read this if you don't enjoy chemistry.
...?

Really?

Ever hear of either of these guys?
Illy
Lavazza

Sure the coffee sucks, but there are TONS of shops (especially if we look globally) that use preground espresso.

-bry

passamike said:

I've never heard of preground espresso being shipped to a commercial coffee shop before?

Paul Whitehead said:
Migle Douvia said:
I guess there's a trend in UK to drink green coffee for health reasons. .

Working in a very busy uk cafe, I've never had anyone come in and ask if we serve green bean espresso, or ever heard of it before this thread. i think there's much more work to be done on the uk public regarding traditional espresso before anyone sticks green beans in a basket! what 'health reasons' are there here? confused!
Some folks will eat or drink anything for "health reasons"
Where is my "fresh" black coffee.

Bryan Wray said:
...?

Really?

Ever hear of either of these guys?
Illy
Lavazza

Sure the coffee sucks, but there are TONS of shops (especially if we look globally) that use preground espresso.

-bry

passamike said:

I've never heard of preground espresso being shipped to a commercial coffee shop before?

Paul Whitehead said:
Migle Douvia said:
I guess there's a trend in UK to drink green coffee for health reasons. .

Working in a very busy uk cafe, I've never had anyone come in and ask if we serve green bean espresso, or ever heard of it before this thread. i think there's much more work to be done on the uk public regarding traditional espresso before anyone sticks green beans in a basket! what 'health reasons' are there here? confused!

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