My current employment is a café/roastery, and hopefully soon, they will be able to teach me a little more about it, I.E. actually how to function the machine. In my opinion, we roast too light, and two dark. Practically we roast strictly on the Cracks, and I don't like that much. I'm trying to convince them to try a few different times so we can make the coffee have loads more flavor and hopefully be really sweet. 

 

I believe the drum can roast 30lbs at once, but we typically do about 28lbs. Any suggestions of some key times that would be optimal for a great, sweet, tasty bean (especially with the new drip station). 

 

Thanks

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Very true John, I use an IRoast2 sometimes depending..... The roaster or type of roaster I mean is the least of your concerns. I wouldn't use a frying pan...<;^)

If you can achieve your approx. roast level enough to cup the coffee's that your target goal as a bean buyer/roaster. If you were to really look at so called "sample roasters" they have little or no controls for profiling.

Joseph Robertson
Sasquatch Coffee Roasters
Craft Coffee Roasting by Design
joe@sasquatchcoffee.com
(360)521-3104     PO Box 451 Stevenson,Washington 98648 USA

John Gibbons said:

As for sample roasting, how is that done without a small drum roaster. Doesn't less beans mean the temperature can easily raise and wouldn't the time be shorter? I would expect the different amounts in different size drums change a lot. 

 

How would you go about this? 

I really like James Hoffmann's idea of pulling a sample every minute after the first crack starts. It seems like that way you can find what's best and from there, narrow the window even more. 

Yeah, I noticed that! The prices also seems absurd to me for 2 or 3 tiny drums. What would your suggestions be? I'll have more of an idea once I get to use the "big roaster" (not that big) and get the sort of idea I'm aiming for. 

Joseph Robertson said:

Very true John, I use an IRoast2 sometimes depending..... The roaster or type of roaster I mean is the least of your concerns. I wouldn't use a frying pan...<;^)

If you can achieve your approx. roast level enough to cup the coffee's that your target goal as a bean buyer/roaster. If you were to really look at so called "sample roasters" they have little or no controls for profiling.

Joseph Robertson
Sasquatch Coffee Roasters
Craft Coffee Roasting by Design
joe@sasquatchcoffee.com
(360)521-3104     PO Box 451 Stevenson,Washington 98648 USA

John Gibbons said:

As for sample roasting, how is that done without a small drum roaster. Doesn't less beans mean the temperature can easily raise and wouldn't the time be shorter? I would expect the different amounts in different size drums change a lot. 

 

How would you go about this? 

I really like James Hoffmann's idea of pulling a sample every minute after the first crack starts. It seems like that way you can find what's best and from there, narrow the window even more. 

http://www.amazon.com/Coffee-tech-Home-Coffee-Roaster-Motorized/dp/...

 

is what I use

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6-byFTDNjQ

 

I can keep it consistent and have some control.  I am able to cup and it has proven accurate over the past 8 months (which is when we started using it).  I am quite happy with it.

 

And I am aware it is cracking a good bit at the end that was our first time roasting that coffee!

Awesome! Sounds good to me. Not sure if I'll be able to afford it, but we'll see : )
The sample roaster I have always used is an electric Alpenrost. It has been a very good tool.

http://www.amazon.com/Alpenrost-Rotary-Drum-Coffee-Roaster/dp/B0000...

I think the Sonofresco could be a good sample roaster.  It's fluid bed (air roasted) but I saw them at CoffeeFest and I was really really surprised by how well they worked and how consistent a roast it produced.  I talked with the owner about disabling the auto-roast in order that a user could actually profile with it and he sounded a bit reluctant but I think he could be convinced to offer a version like that.

I think they're about $2000 - which is a LOT less than a drum roaster.  We're seriously considering one for the cafe's sampler.

That's a good suggestion, and it may definitely help in the future. As for me, i'm poor and 19, so it might be a while

Stickman said:

I think the Sonofresco could be a good sample roaster.  It's fluid bed (air roasted) but I saw them at CoffeeFest and I was really really surprised by how well they worked and how consistent a roast it produced.  I talked with the owner about disabling the auto-roast in order that a user could actually profile with it and he sounded a bit reluctant but I think he could be convinced to offer a version like that.

I think they're about $2000 - which is a LOT less than a drum roaster.  We're seriously considering one for the cafe's sampler.

Hi John,

I am new to roasting as well, been doing it for a little over a year now. I started on a Stir Crazy Turbo Oven set up that I modified a little bit. I found that it gave me great results and it allowed me to do anywhere from 8-12 oz. very well. It cost about a $100. I just ordered a 1 Kilo roaster from someone who makes them in his machine shop as a hobby and can't wait to get my hands on it. I would highly recommend the SO/TO for home use. It is fun and I have roasted about a 100 pounds on it. That comes out to about a buck per roast and has paid for it self. I have learned the most from a couple of roast masters who have been kind enough to let me observe and ask A LOT of questions though. Just watching and asking as many questions as they will let you would be my biggest advice.

 

I am new to this site as well and would like to thank all of those who share their experiences with us. It means a lot to be able to hear from people who really care and are willing to share. 

 

Good Luck!

Home roasting can be fun if it's a passion and can produce good to excellent consistent results. Can also produce willy nilly results. Just depends on what you put into it. Turning beans brown is easy, learning to make beans sing is a lifetime Journey.

 

Suggest checking out Sweet Maria's email based chat list (been on it for a decade)

SM's newer forum

and Homeroasters.org forum 

to start your home roasting education.

miKe,

As to Tom and Maria's chat list. I have gleaned more from the list and you guys than any roasting school has provided for me with less out of pocket $ and no air fare. ;^)

Maybe a little hot air once in a while but it's usually from me.

For me it's a form of mentoring with minds with first hand experience, Priceless.

Joe

 

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