ok. so what is your favorite method of making coffee?

chemex? 
french press?
or
drip?


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While I don't want to derail the topic either, I think a discussion of why or why not a brewing method is sensible in a post talking about why we prefer our favorite brewing methods is just barely on topic enough for me to continue it in here verses breaking the discussion away... If moderators or Dan would like the conversation broken away I'll be more than happy to move posts to a new post.

Getting back to it, while you were speaking to the finished temperature in the cup, I was not. I was speaking to thermocouple readings in the slurry itself.

To solidify my findings, I did another temperature reading experiment today.

I used a different brewing method than you do, one that attempted to better maximize the brewing temperature. Therefore, the lid stayed on the entire time, it was not removed to stir at two different points. I used a preheated ceramic saucer as a lid. It fits more snuggly, is thicker and retains heat better than the thin, plastic lid that comes with the Clever. Also, the Clever was not set on a cold counter, it was set atop the coaster which was placed on a mug that contained off boil water in hopes that the water would help send some heat up towards the bottom of the slurry.

I was using a coffee that is best with 202.5F brew water, so I used that. I used 32g of coffee. Brew time was 3 minutes.

Results were not shocking. Even with all of the additions and modifications the plastic walls just let too much temperature go.

In the first 1:15 the temperature dropped all the way down to 192.1 from 202.5. Temperature declined slowed down a bit after this.

At 3 minutes when I went to set the dripper on the mug the slurry read 181.2 F, my best findings so far, but still not anything to brag about.

If my experiments had involved 2 stirring points and the brew time was 4 minutes I think I would have been sitting around 170 at the end of the process.

But indeed, the temperature in the cup after my experiment read very close to what you had found, 163.6 F.

Like I said earlier, I like the concept, I just think it's a poor example of the concept. I'd much rather have heat loss over 20 seconds while the rest of my V60 drains through for temperature readings of 192 at the end of the extraction than heat loss for 3-4 minutes while my Clever just sits there for temperature readings of 181.

My .02
-bry
Good job on a truly thorough analysis Bry.

It's dialog like this that makes Barista Exchange a great source of education and wondrous open discussion.

By the way, I never did see where you stated YOUR favorite method of making coffee...



Bryan Wray said:
While I don't want to derail the topic either, I think a discussion of why or why not a brewing method is sensible in a post talking about why we prefer our favorite brewing methods is just barely on topic enough for me to continue it in here verses breaking the discussion away... If moderators or Dan would like the conversation broken away I'll be more than happy to move posts to a new post.

Getting back to it, while you were speaking to the finished temperature in the cup, I was not. I was speaking to thermocouple readings in the slurry itself.

To solidify my findings, I did another temperature reading experiment today.

I used a different brewing method than you do, one that attempted to better maximize the brewing temperature. Therefore, the lid stayed on the entire time, it was not removed to stir at two different points. I used a preheated ceramic saucer as a lid. It fits more snuggly, is thicker and retains heat better than the thin, plastic lid that comes with the Clever. Also, the Clever was not set on a cold counter, it was set atop the coaster which was placed on a mug that contained off boil water in hopes that the water would help send some heat up towards the bottom of the slurry.

I was using a coffee that is best with 202.5F brew water, so I used that. I used 32g of coffee. Brew time was 3 minutes.

Results were not shocking. Even with all of the additions and modifications the plastic walls just let too much temperature go.

In the first 1:15 the temperature dropped all the way down to 192.1 from 202.5. Temperature declined slowed down a bit after this.

At 3 minutes when I went to set the dripper on the mug the slurry read 181.2 F, my best findings so far, but still not anything to brag about.

If my experiments had involved 2 stirring points and the brew time was 4 minutes I think I would have been sitting around 170 at the end of the process.

But indeed, the temperature in the cup after my experiment read very close to what you had found, 163.6 F.

Like I said earlier, I like the concept, I just think it's a poor example of the concept. I'd much rather have heat loss over 20 seconds while the rest of my V60 drains through for temperature readings of 192 at the end of the extraction than heat loss for 3-4 minutes while my Clever just sits there for temperature readings of 181.

My .02
-bry
I fall into the same camp as Jay for this one.

For example, I've found that our decaf is best in an Aeropress. I usually like E.African coffees through V60s, Centrals through Beehouses.

When I'm trying to represent "clear, clean, bright, fruity, tea-like" flavors in a coffee I use a Chemex, but the loss of mouthfeel is substantial.

I typically don't like French press at all, too much "noise" in the way of flavors. Call it body if you want, but to me its just like food with too much seasoning in it; you can taste everything and nothing all at once. I also don't typically like the "wet-hull" processed Indo coffees, too many "off" flavors. However, since not everyone has my palate and preference, I find these two paired together usually result in exactly what the customer is looking for.

Vac pots are impressive when done properly. I like coffees that carry a lot of berry flavor when run through a vac pot. The finicky temperature swings make it impractical for day to day use to me though, especially if in a setup where you don't have access to proper temperature monitoring equipment.

I think the K-One should teach us a lot about proper pour over technique and proper pairing of burr sets to brewing methods, but I haven't worked with it enough to have anything substantial to offer.

Not sure that's much of anything in the way of favorites, so I'll just say that I like V60 the best because I think it's the most easily manipulated depending on what flavors and/or body qualities you want to have end up in finished cup. (and having said that I think it has more to do with the filter than anything else...)

-bry

Okay, this is my new pet-project. Our shop has always been geared toward commuter-coffee drinkers and simple espresso, but after reading about how big manual brewing and single-cup service is getting, I have started experimenting with different brewing profiles for a few of our different varietals and blends. I have a jury-rig consisting of an old French-press, a hotplate, cooking thermometer, and a consumer scale. I don't have as much control over the grind and I don't have many tools. I'd love to try some other methods if I knew where to start.

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