I have been considering the conversion to only two drink sizes. 8oz and 12oz?

My caffe is supposed to be strongly Italian/ European influenced, which is outstanding in some ways: expectation of quality, passion for the COFFEE (milk is additional), simplicity, and also it is a relatively exotic concept for 'these' Americans. But at the same time, my Caffe is a part of a luxury hotel, which implies hospitality, which further implies virtually insane accommodation for the guest. I don't WANT to make VENTI CARAMEL MACCHIATOS!!!

At the same time, we do have some pretty amazing "dessert" drinks, but they all embrace balance of flavors and an emphasis on coffee. How much can that justify saying, "sorry" we don't make caramel macchiatos here, or sorry we only serve an 8oz Cappuccino?

Do any of you guys have experience with 'limited' menus or only one, smaller size?

Views: 81

Reply to This

Replies to This Discussion

Yes, we own a small specialty coffee house in Rincon, Puerto Rico called Banana Dang with a very limited menu. Our market is 90% tourists and a few locals. We serve 8oz and 12oz espresso based drinks.

The tourists come from all over the world - the ones from the States are used to 24 oz lattes. We've heard comments like "make my drink just like Starbucks" to which we reply, "We can't, but we will do our best." After they sip a Macchiato in a demitasse (not a Venti), their eyes always light up.

People will appreciate what you have to offer when the quality of the drink speaks for itself. If you don't carry 24oz cups, you won't have to deal with 24oz drinks. We also only carry 4 syrups (vanilla, banana, hazelnut and caramel). That way we can focus on the "traditional" espresso based drinks (we express this to the customer). Customers want to feel special, and will appreciate the espresso knowledge they receive when they walk into your store. We do give customers some sort of customization option - if they want a 4 shot cappuccino with 2 flavorings of syrup, we will serve it but will add that "we can't guarantee the taste" since it's not in our drink menu. They come back 100% of the time.
Intelli LA serves 8-12oz lattes, 6oz capps and only 12oz coffee.
We're fairly successful with the limited smaller size.

We don't consider ourselves "traditional", we simply make drinks the way we feel they taste best.
Be careful with pushing the traditional aspect of espresso bars.
To a lot of people traditional Italian screams a host of bad things i.e. not cleaning the espresso machine, 7g singles, pre-grinding, using lower grade coffee mixed with robusta like Illy or LavAzza.
"Traditional" is also a bit of indicator that progress has been ignored in some respects and you might be using some older techniques or practices that have been improved upon.

Bottom line, do things the way YOU feel they taste best. And if you fell they taste best with robusta coffee out of a dirty machine... well, good luck (That was just an example, I'm assuming you clean your machine and use a good quality, locally roasted espresso).
Nick
I agree with both of the responses. At Barefoot we serve 12oz lattes, 6oz cappuccinos and 12 or 20oz coffee.

Being a passionate, educated and quality-focused barista goes a long way with customers. That said, I understand how difficult it is to go from serving syrup-based drinks, etc to a simple, coffee-centered menu.

If you really stand behind your craft, I think it's perfectly fine to assume that the customer is not always right, however they are "king' and deserve great service. Saying "sorry" oftentimes isn't enough, it's important to explain why what you serve is better.

Marie
Andrew...so I'll humbly share what we came up with for a marketing answer to this dilema; split menu. Left side of the short menu (essentially) says, "Traditional Northern Italian", and the right side of the menu, "American Espresso Drinks." I'm not saying this is the answer, but just sharing what some thought on this produced for us. My sales model started, and will stay, a very short menu. We're still in development as inserts for up and running businesses. I saw no reason to upset servers over trying to train the populace; that's a tall order. And as most have found, it can be challenging and sometimes demoralizing. It takes you off-focus on your chosen mission. So the suggestion here is to let the customer start the conversation by asking why the board-menu is split in half. Short sentence responses, waiting for the next question, is best. When they stop asking, you start brewing. Worst case, you'll get a certain percentage that will try something they haven't had before. This presumes that you'll stock and serve some limited amount of "coffee flavored milk drinks."
I appreciate your insight into the connotations of "traditional." It's really true. I mean, where did coffee come from? Over-roasted, inconsistent, etc. I'll look to present a quality interpretation of traditionally inspired coffee.

Nick Griffith said:
Intelli LA serves 8-12oz lattes, 6oz capps and only 12oz coffee.
We're fairly successful with the limited smaller size.

We don't consider ourselves "traditional", we simply make drinks the way we feel they taste best.
Be careful with pushing the traditional aspect of espresso bars.
To a lot of people traditional Italian screams a host of bad things i.e. not cleaning the espresso machine, 7g singles, pre-grinding, using lower grade coffee mixed with robusta like Illy or LavAzza.
"Traditional" is also a bit of indicator that progress has been ignored in some respects and you might be using some older techniques or practices that have been improved upon.

Bottom line, do things the way YOU feel they taste best. And if you fell they taste best with robusta coffee out of a dirty machine... well, good luck (That was just an example, I'm assuming you clean your machine and use a good quality, locally roasted espresso).
Nick
Right. Well put, Nick. By "traditional" we meant cup sizes, not bad cleaning habits. We keep an eye on best methods and also serve the best coffee we can find on the island. On occasion we ship in some Intelligentsia as a special treat. Thanks for clarifying that.

Nick Griffith said:
Intelli LA serves 8-12oz lattes, 6oz capps and only 12oz coffee.
We're fairly successful with the limited smaller size.

We don't consider ourselves "traditional", we simply make drinks the way we feel they taste best.
Be careful with pushing the traditional aspect of espresso bars.
To a lot of people traditional Italian screams a host of bad things i.e. not cleaning the espresso machine, 7g singles, pre-grinding, using lower grade coffee mixed with robusta like Illy or LavAzza.
"Traditional" is also a bit of indicator that progress has been ignored in some respects and you might be using some older techniques or practices that have been improved upon.

Bottom line, do things the way YOU feel they taste best. And if you fell they taste best with robusta coffee out of a dirty machine... well, good luck (That was just an example, I'm assuming you clean your machine and use a good quality, locally roasted espresso).
Nick
Watch out! A well-pulled 7g single can be a beautiful thing! I could talk just as much junk about the overdosed crap a lot of espresso jockies out there are slinging...

But on the topic: if you stand to your guns and explain politely to your customers what you are doing, you will do fine. Some people may not come back, in favor of the bar down the street that will serve them a 16oz, extra hot hazlenut cappuccino, but thems the breaks.

I've also found that standing the occasional reluctant customer a drink goes a long way. Someting like, "here: this is how we make a latte. It's on me". Most of the time they love it and become repeats. That's not to say they don't also go elsewhere occasionally to get their caramel macchiato fix!

Nick Griffith said:
Intelli LA serves 8-12oz lattes, 6oz capps and only 12oz coffee. We're fairly successful with the limited smaller size.
We don't consider ourselves "traditional", we simply make drinks the way we feel they taste best.
Be careful with pushing the traditional aspect of espresso bars.
To a lot of people traditional Italian screams a host of bad things i.e. not cleaning the espresso machine, 7g singles, pre-grinding, using lower grade coffee mixed with robusta like Illy or LavAzza.
"Traditional" is also a bit of indicator that progress has been ignored in some respects and you might be using some older techniques or practices that have been improved upon.

Bottom line, do things the way YOU feel they taste best. And if you fell they taste best with robusta coffee out of a dirty machine... well, good luck (That was just an example, I'm assuming you clean your machine and use a good quality, locally roasted espresso).
Nick
I had a custokmer enter my new store in belfast looking for a quality take away sandwich, he was holding a frappeccino from starbucks! a caramel one i think! Now I asked him why he didnt let us make it! He said because he never knew we done it!

So what did I do!? I offered him a trade- i made him my own caramel frappe with a couple of shots of great espresso, took his starbucks one off him and binned it!

As independant coffee shops we have the ability to super customize our drinks! We shouldn't say, we'll try our best! we shouild say like starbucks, ill make you drink which will make you never retrun to starbucks!

also on the size front, for a wee while i ran a 8 and 12oz takeaway cup, i've stripped it down to just 12oz, this works for me, when people ask for a small they get 12oz, when they ask for a reg they get 12oz. Its simple and i dont think i would ever go any bigger, not in ireland anyway, its not particularly normal here for 20oz coffee etc. But i suppose if the market your in wants 20oz drinks they have to get it!

I suggest asking your customers what they thinki??? they know best they buy from you?

g

Reply to Discussion

RSS

Barista Exchange Partners

Barista Exchange Friends

Keep Barista Exchange Free

Are you enjoying Barista Exchange? Is it helping you promote your business and helping you network in this great industry? Donate today to keep it free to all members. Supporters can join the "Supporters Group" with a donation. Thanks!

Clicky Web Analytics

© 2021   Created by Matt Milletto.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service