We're thinking adding grean bean espresso to the menu at our coffee shop, but need to learn more about the green beans. Has anybody know how to grind them? What kinds of green beans should be used to make green bean espresso? Any input would be greatly appreciated.

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Welcome to bX, Migle. I see from your profile that you are pretty new to the industry... lots of good info here for you.

To your question... I've never heard of this before. I'm not sure it is even possible, and am reasonably sure it is not a good idea. The unroasted bean is rock hard and I believe would tastes terrible if brewed.

Where did this idea come from, BTW?
Thanks for warm welcome, Brady. Yes indeed a lot to learn here. I guess there's a trend in UK to drink green coffee for health reasons. We actually tried grinding some, but as you say beans are rock hard and we jammed up our coffee grinder. It doesn't taste too bad actually, somewhat like an herbal tea. Of course with a lot of steamed milk and white chocolate.

Brady said:
Welcome to bX, Migle. I see from your profile that you are pretty new to the industry... lots of good info here for you.

To your question... I've never heard of this before. I'm not sure it is even possible, and am reasonably sure it is not a good idea. The unroasted bean is rock hard and I believe would tastes terrible if brewed.

Where did this idea come from, BTW?
I have heard the term "white espresso" which refers to pulling the beans from the roaster very early on in the roasting process. People have said that it is very peanutt-y and grassy. I believe that some amount of roasting is necessary though, if just to reach a lower moisture content and change the texture of the bean.

I have never tried this, though i am curious.
Are sure that your not talking about white espresso? If so, I don't know much about it but it is roasted, just very, very light.
OOOHHHH.... someone came into the Roastery Cafe the other day, looked at some greens we had sitting out and said, "Oh... are those the white espresso beans?"

To which I basically responded, "What the hell?" because I had never heard of such a thing before... this must have been what they were talking about.

Weird...

Sounds gross.

That's all I have to say about that. =) Except for if you run totally green beans through your grinder you can probably expect it to last about a week... not a long life for a $1000+ grinder. Better be charging a lot for a shot of that ;)

-bry
I had the opportunity to tour a roaster in Seattle (area) that roasted white coffee. It was basically roasted to gold and then dropped. They then put it through their industrial grinder that was reserved for that coffee only and shipped it ground. I was told that if they shipped it whole bean it would ruin their customer's grinders. They said that people enjoyed it because they wanted more caffeine and the caffeine had not yet been roasted out of it.

Further experience: When sample roasting on a new sample roaster a while back we were trying some weird things with the roaster, not really with the beans. We happened to drop a batch at this roast level. I can't remember why, but it was not to taste. Yet, we are all ever so curious, and so of course the white coffee made it to the cupping table. It tasted like grassy cheese puffs. It was very odd indeed. It may have been developed a bit longer than the coffees that are giving off green tea notes. It was pretty awful. We then let it rest for a few days (off gas if you will). It started getting a horribly sour smell to it, so we threw it out.

That is my experience. I hope this does not discourage you in your search for answers. I wish we would have pulled shots with it. That would have been interesting. On second though,... Maybe I should be glad that I passed on that opportunity!! Let me know if you get good results. I'll try anything twice!!
:)
I'm a bean muncher.

I'll munch any bean to get an impression of what the coffee might taste like.

I've munched a green bean. I will not munch a green bean again. Horribly astringent.

I remember reading about white espresso a year or two ago, but it sounded pretty bad (having munched lots of beans), so I never really gave it a chance.
Wow, what an overwhelming response and great info. Thank you so much, folks. I'm so glad I found the "Barista Exchange". I'll turn to the "coffee experts" for everyhting now, well, not everything, I hope. So I guess I was using the wrong term. It is more commonly known as a "white espresso". Very good to know. That's why the roaster we're using was absolutely perplexed of me wanting ground up green beans. I will definatelly keep you posted of our customer response to "white espresso white chocolate mochas". Good luck!
Haha. That is hilarious. I wish I could have been there when it happened.

Bryan Wray said:
OOOHHHH.... someone came into the Roastery Cafe the other day, looked at some greens we had sitting out and said, "Oh... are those the white espresso beans?"

To which I basically responded, "What the hell?" because I had never heard of such a thing before... this must have been what they were talking about.

Weird...

Sounds gross.

That's all I have to say about that. =) Except for if you run totally green beans through your grinder you can probably expect it to last about a week... not a long life for a $1000+ grinder. Better be charging a lot for a shot of that ;)

-bry
The lady actually came back in this afternoon. I referenced this thread...

As I was making her drink I asked her what she thought of it, her response sent me to the floor laughing:

"Ever mowed your lawn with your teeth through a dirty sock?... That's white espresso"

To which I literally collapsed onto the floor.

-bry
Migle Douvia said:
Wow, what an overwhelming response and great info. Thank you so much, folks. I'm so glad I found the "Barista Exchange". I'll turn to the "coffee experts" for everyhting now, well, not everything, I hope. So I guess I was using the wrong term. It is more commonly known as a "white espresso". Very good to know. That's why the roaster we're using was absolutely perplexed of me wanting ground up green beans. I will definatelly keep you posted of our customer response to "white espresso white chocolate mochas". Good luck!

Don't be surprised if your roaster is equally perplexed by white espresso. Though some of us may have heard of it (I hadn't) it sounds like this is not something that's widely done, at all. I'd be surprised if they even offer it.

Good luck.

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